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Samuda says action will be taken in CMU matter, if required

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Samuda says action will be taken in CMU matter, if required

BY ALPHEA SAUNDERS
Senior staff reporter
saundersa@jamaicaobserver.com

Friday, January 24, 2020

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MINISTER without portfolio with responsibility for education Karl Samuda has indicated that, if the law has to be called in based on the findings of the auditor general’s special report on the Caribbean Maritime University (CMU) and the education ministry, justice will be allowed to take its course.

“Whatever mistakes have been made that would accrue to persons who were responsible then obviously, if it requires action by the authorities, then that action must be taken,” Samuda told journalists yesterday afternoon following a meeting with staff at the CMU.

Asked if he would be prepared to call in the police if it becomes necessary, he stated: “We all know that mistakes have been made, what is important is to reflect on where you went wrong and to chart a course in a positive way as to how best to ensure it doesn’t happen again, and to improve on the methods that were applied when they were going wrong.”

The tabling of the special report in the House of Representatives on Tuesday was surrounded by controversy, after a week of the leaked report being dissected in the media.

Samuda stressed that there should be no fear about the future of the CMU, as the institution is strong and manned by competent people.

“The morale of the students, from all indications, is very high, [and] the morale of the teachers, although they are concerned… We are picking up the pieces in a positive way, we cannot be stymied by our determination to dwell entirely on the past,” he stated.

He said the procurement issues laid out in the auditor general’s report would be addressed as well as the fall down in the reporting mechanism between CMU and the education ministry. “We have put in place a system which will see the quick reparation of those reports for tabling through the Cabinet to Parliament,” he said.

Permanent Secretary Dr Grace McLean indicated that the 2015/2016 annual report will be ready by end of April, and the others by the end of May.

The auditor general said the CMU’s Council had not faithfully prepared and submitted to respective permanent secretaries and portfolio ministers, half-yearly and annual reports nor audited financial statements.

Next Monday, the proposed membership for a new CMU Council is to be submitted to Cabinet.

“I expect that as soon as that is done then the board will meet and they will look at all the records that are available and they will be briefed by the acting president and other heads of department, and from there they will make the appropriate decisions,” the portfolio minister said.

Meanwhile, he said the staff was concerned about the lack of information flow between them and the leadership of the institution on issues such as contracts and general working conditions.

“We are far along the way of solving most of the problems that they are confronted with. We have suggested that going forward there has to be closer interaction between the leadership of the organisation and the workers,” he said.

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Lessons from the 1918 influenza pandemic

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Lessons from the 1918 influenza pandemic

Warrick
Lattibeaudiere

Sunday, February 16, 2020

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WHILE no one can definitively say where the flu of 1918 started or how, some have attributed its start to Spain, an area hard hit by the virus in May of the year, hence the term Spanish flu.

Truth be told, China and the US had witnessed the outbreak in March of the same year. It had a start experts would consider relatively mild in the spring of 1918, when it lasted for three days. However, its resurgence in autumn would go down as unforgettable to humankind.

While it is said Boston was the starting point in the US, in a few days people were literally falling like flies all over. The dead were piled up in corridors and rooms, dead rooms (which were later declared living rooms when the virus vanished, according to The Ladies’ Home Journal). The stench was unbearable. Remote villages across central Africa, the Eskimos of Alaska and the islands of the Pacific coast were devastatingly hit. Piled-up bodies became pyres, as people were dying at a rate faster than graves could be dug.

Only St Helena and Mauritius were said to have escaped this pandemic.

The stats

While a figure of 21 million has been cited as the toll wreaked by this angel of death, experts are now judging this figure as way too low, with citations of between 50 million and 100 million people. Weighing in on the ghastly sum is noted epidemiologist John M Barry, in his book The Great Influenza: “Influenza killed more people in a year than the Black Death of the Middle Ages killed in a century; it killed more people in 24 weeks than AIDS has killed in 24 years.”

In all, some 500,000,000 people had to take to bed, with pregnant women facing a double threat. How did some recover? Can we learn today from what some did then?

Treatment

Resting in bed proved to be invaluable advice doctors ordered. Keeping warm and drinking plenty of fluids did much good also.

Different doctors experimented with different methods of treatment, some more novel than others. One doctor in Chicago had under his care 600 patients treating with a mixture primarily comprising grapefruit. Every one survived save for his son, who, ironically, defied his father’s orders and came out of bed so as to tend to his burgeoning undertaking business.

Clearly, grapefruit — rich in vitamin C, a great antioxidant, along with its carotenoid and limonoid components, phytonutrients — boosted bodies and immune systems against the deadly flu of 1918-9.

In Cincinnati, where 40,000 cases were reported, some benefited from the advice one doctor gave. He advised for one to have a big pan of onions in the room as well as apply a poultice of the onion to the chest. To the surprise of many, individuals recovered from pneumonia, which had been the worst stage of the flu.

Safeguards

Given the global panic, everything seemed to be a precaution — from wearing fresh pyjamas to not shaking hands, taking castor oil, washing hands ever so often, and avoiding subways. Many had to wear face masks and strict fines or imprisonment were imposed in some areas. In other areas, one could not board a public vehicle without wearing a mask.

Many libraries stopped circulating books, for fear the virus would spread with them. Barbers could not shave customers as this contact was felt to be too risky. Some streets were awash with sanitising agents. Public sneezing was banned and punishable by fines and jail terms. As simple as this seemed, it helped to curtail the pestilence further, since a sneeze can send out 85,000,000 bacteria with particles reaching a distance of 12 feet, which can remain suspended for upwards of half an hour in the air. Clearly, everyone’s health became his or her concern, and people felt that desperate times called for desperate measures.

As the world braces for what might result from the novel coronavirus, now known as COVID-19, people will do well to recall the havoc wreaked by Spanish influenza and recognise that these flu-like viruses in our time are nothing to joke about. While it is not expected that the number of fatalities from COVID-19 will be anything near that of the Spanish flu, we will do well to follow precautions given and boost our immune system as much as possible, such that, individually, we are ready.

Warrick Lattibeaudiere (PhD), a minister of religion for the past 22 years, lectures full-time in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

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Public and private researchers hunt coronavirus cure

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Public and private researchers hunt coronavirus cure

Sunday, February 16, 2020

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PARIS, France (AFP) — Researchers both public and private have launched efforts to combat the novel coronavirus, now known as COVID-19, that has already infected tens of thousands of people in China, and profit isn’t their only motivation.

 

The big players?

Researchers are working in three main areas: Developing diagnostic tests, developing a vaccine, and testing of antivirals as a treatment for those infected.

Major public research laboratories such as the US National Institutes of Health, non-profit foundations like the Pasteur Institute in France, as well as universities like the University of Melbourne in Australia have started working on the coronavirus.

Biotech firms have also jumped in, such as Moderna Therapeutics and Inovio Pharma, which were selected by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), a global alliance financing and coordinating the development of vaccines against emerging infectious diseases.

US biotech firm Gilead is meanwhile working with Chinese authorities on the potential use of remdesivir, which it developed as a treatment for Ebola, for the novel coronavirus.

Some pharma giants have also offered their help, such as Britain’s GlaxoSmithKline, which said it would make available its adjuvant technology that helps the body produce a stronger immune response to vaccines.

In the United States, Johnson and Johnson has said it will collaborate with public researchers to accelerate development of a vaccine, while in France Sanofi has lent its expertise to CEPI.

Overall, public and private researchers are collaborating, of which CEPI is a good illustration.

 

Vaccines can be big business. The French Government alone spent 380 million euros (US$413 million) for vaccines against the H1N1 swine flu in 2009-2010.

On Wall Street, the shares in biotech firms Moderna and Inovio shot higher after their coronavirus work was announced… although they later pulled back.

While vaccines may be a very important product they are not a very lucrative one as they are usually sold a low prices.

Most pharmaceutical firms have chosen to concentrate on developing drugs for cancer and rare diseases, where the prices are much higher, with some costing as much as US$2 million per treatment.

“The vaccine business in general represents two per cent of the global drug market,” said economist Claude Le Pen who focuses on the health sector.

“If a laboratory finds a therapy, in the current climate there will be intense pressure for the treatment to be sold at a low cost,” he added.

Added to that is the risk that after months of work to develop and test a treatment the epidemic could long be over.

 

Why bother?

“In terms of public and government relations, for a laboratory it is logical to say, ‘We are health actors and we’ll take care of you’,” said Jean-Jacques Le Fur, a pharmaceutical industry specialist at investment bank Bryan, Garnier & Co.

“There is also scientific prestige. You shouldn’t underestimate professional motivation,” he added.

Biotech companies that succeed in adapting a vaccine or antiviral treatment quickly will be able to more easily attract financing for their own projects, Le Fur noted.

 

What about supplies?

This is a concern that France’s pharmaceutical academy voiced last week. That is because Asia produces most of the active ingredients used in drugs. Some 80 per cent of the active components used in EU medicines come from third world countries, with India and China alone accounting for 60 per cent.

European pharmaceutical companies said there is no reason to panic.

“In general we have several suppliers for key ingredients in order to reduce the risk of supply disruptions and the situation in China is no different,” said France’s Sanofi.

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Emotional PTSD

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Away, boy, from the troops,

And save thyself;

For friends kill friends,

And the disorder’s such

As war were hoodwink’d.

Shakespeare, Cymbeline, V, 2

 

PTSD (Post-traumatic stress disorder). Such a fancy name for what people suffer from after a monumental event that adversely affects and impacts their lives. Usually it’s applied to soldiers who experienced the ravages of war and now can’t deal with the normal reality of life. It was General William T Sherman who said, “War is hell,” and hell has terrible consequences.

Even Shakespeare mentioned disorder in the quote above, and urges young people to save themselves and not fall prey to the disorder. It’s not only war that leaves people suffering with PTSD, but also from other tumultuous events that impacted heavily on their lives. And what can be more stressful than emotional crosses?

This can be almost anything a bad childhood, an abusive relationship, a horrible time at school, or even a series of bad sexual experiences. Remember, all of these events can adversely affect someone, and what they do as a result can impact negatively on their lives and on the lives of others.

Emotional PTSD we’ll find out more about this affliction, right after these responses to ‘When men cry’.

 

Hi Teerob,

Great and incisive piece on the oft misunderstood subject of men crying. I am happy that you sought the input of a psychologist to give your many readers a professional opinion. Pent up feelings cannot possibly be healthy. Continue the good work.

Owen J.

 

Hi Tony,

I can’t remember ever crying as a young adult. There were times at sad movies, funerals and such, that I fought and held it in, but now in my old age, I find the tears come more easily at really sad occasions. But I have a real excuse… dry eyes. According to my doctor, I think it is men-o-pause.

Cecil

 

PTSD is short for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and is usually attributed to military personnel. It’s become quite a popular term nowadays, especially in the USA where soldiers, after serving tours of duty and experiencing the horrors of war, return home and freak out, get depressed, and often commit their own horrors as they shoot up people and places.

In many cases, the remarks by others may be snide, as they comment, “Oh, he’s suffering from PTSD, yeah right.” It’s often used as an excuse, but it’s very real.

“Look how he shot up the place and burned down the house.”

“Oh, forgive him, he’s suffering from PTSD.”

Many are suicidal and, ironically, more US soldiers die every day from suicide than from battle-related conflicts. Twenty-two veterans commit suicide daily.

It seems as if every puss and dog and his granny are suffering from PTSD whenever they freak out and create havoc and mayhem in society. How can you tell if it’s real though, what are the symptoms?

The research indicates: Signs of PTSD can range from flashbacks to nightmares, panic attacks, to eating disorders and cognitive delays to lowered verbal memory capacity. Many trauma survivors also encounter substance abuse issues as they attempt to self-medicate the negative effects of PTSD.

Well, blow me down and knock me over with a feather, that sounds really fancy and highfalutin, but remember, I did say that it’s not only war veterans who suffer from this malady, but regular people who experience emotional turmoil too. Ergo, emotional PTSD. They shoot up the place, create mayhem, have severe mood swings, are suicidal. Sounds familiar?

“What happen to that man, how him carrying on like that, kill his woman and then himself, and he never went to war?”

“No, but he suffered from Emotional PTSD.”

Another symptom engulfs the person who got so used to the ravages of war that they often miss it when they return to normal life. Oh yes, after experiencing all that trauma and stress of battle, normal life turns out to be boring, so they’ll do anything to recreate the battlefield mayhem. “I love the smell of napalm in the morning, it reminds me of victory,” said Robert Duvall in the movie Platoon.

Ironically, some soldiers will choose war over staying at home with their spouse. What does that say about the spouse? “I will take war over living with her any day.”

Some women who experienced physical abuse in a prior relationship will often miss the battering and brutality, as they saw it as the norm. They may now wonder how come their current spouse doesn’t enjoy the thrill of conflict. “Cho, this man too calm and soff, I need a little excitement in my life, likkle cussing, likkle screaming, likkle boof baff.” Maybe she even wants to exact revenge on all men for what her previous man put her through.

“Caesar’s spirit, ranging for revenge, with Ate by his side come hot from hell, shall in these confines with a monarch’s voice, cry “havoc and let slip the dogs of war”, said Antony in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar.

For this very same reason, some soldiers keep re-enlisting, going back to the battlefield, as they cannot cope with civilian life that they find so boring. So it is with regular people too, as they seek out the very same conflict that they suffered for years.

Men suffer from this too and will usually seek out the same type of woman that made their lives a living hell.

“How come him end up with woman who always cuss and create crosses suh?”

“Him suffering from emotional PTSD and miss the conflict and aggravation.”

I know many husbands who exhibit the symptoms of emotional PTSD. They walk and talk about how their wives treat them and also turn to substance abuse to self-medicate their condition. Either they smoke weed or drink alcohol.

That’s right, I’m sure that you know that many men are notorious for drowning their sorrows in alcohol as they suffer from emotional PTSD and don’t even know it. They may give the illusion that they enjoy hanging out with their friends and imbibing liquor, but that’s merely a symptom of emotional PTSD brought on by woman battlefield bangarang.

Back to the females who suffer from emotional PTSD, who at times will accuse their current man of having no guts, no backbone, just because he refuses to go to battle with her. “Say sumpting, do sumpting, don’t just sit there and remain calm like you’re made of ice; I dare you to hit me.”

There are those who suffered severely from past relationships, yet refuse to get involved with or marry a man who appears to be too calm and accommodating. “I know that my ex used to beat me, but at least I know that he cared, and I miss that feeling.”

There are men who also miss the thrill of being cheated on. As bizarre as it may sound, it does happen, as those men spent their entire lives tracking, pursuing, trailing, snooping on their wives. That gave them a weird thrill of the hunt, but now that he has a faithful wife who can’t even mash ants, he lost the zest, the excitement, a reason to make his heart race. Cry ‘havoc,’ and let slip the dogs of war.

There are men who actually pay other men to have sex with their wives while they watch. As weird as it may sound, it does happen. But back to those women who constantly return to the scene of the conflict. I’ve been following the case of Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, who’s accused of rape and sexually assaulting countless women.

What I find really strange is the situation of some of these women who claim to be victims, but actually continued to have a long-term sexual relationship with the man, with one even asking him to meet her mother. Many text messages from these women professing love were presented as evidence in the courtroom drama. Is this a case of emotional PTSD, corroborating what I’ve been saying all along? Were some of these women drawn to the emotional excitement but now regret it on reflection?

Emotional PTSD is real, and many are suffering from it without even knowing that they are. Do you exhibit these symptoms mood swings, sudden outbursts of anger, excessive drinking, suicidal thoughts, resentment of the opposite sex? Then maybe you are a victim of emotional PTSD.

More time.

seido1yard@gmail.com

 

Footnote: Somehow we always manage to self-destruct. Our Reggae Girlz made it to the pinnacle of football when they qualified for the World Cup in France last year. Coach Hugh Menzies, who worked for years without pay, was hugely responsible for this success. Yet, he had to leave because of disagreement with the Jamaica Football Federation over money owed to him. Now the team is in shambles, suffering a humiliating 0-9 defeat to Canada recently. No good deed goes unpunished.

Switching sports, the two most prolific batsmen on the West Indies Cricket team were dropped from the squad for the upcoming tour of Sri Lanka, because they were deemed to be “unfit”. This after one of them scored a century in his last match and was awarded man of the series also. The reward for the best performance is to be dropped. Have these self-destructing sporting bodies all gone mad?

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Heroes and villains

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BEIJING, China (AFP) — China’s Government is purging unpopular local officials and commandeering heroic stories of doctors on the frontline as it tries to shield itself from public rage over the handling of the deadly coronavirus epidemic.

Facing the biggest challenge of his presidency, Communist Party leader Xi Jinping has cast the crisis as a “people’s war” and State media have gone into overdrive to regain control of public opinion.

Images of doctors and nurses in masks and full protective suits, leaving their families behind to care for patients, have dominated the airwaves.

Government censors, meanwhile, have made rare exceptions to allow for criticism online — but mostly when directed at local officials accused of negligence in central Hubei province and its capital Wuhan, the epicentre of the outbreak.

One comment that was allowed to circulate on the Twitter-like Weibo platform declared that “scores should be settled against all the officials in Wuhan after the crisis”, which has claimed more than 1,500 lives and infected some 66,000 people.

An investigation into health inspectors in neighbouring Hunan province who had leaked residents’ personal information also became a trending search on the platform.

On Thursday, the political chiefs of Hubei and Wuhan were sacked and replaced with Xi loyalists with security backgrounds. The province’s top two health officials were also fired.

Senior Beijing law enforcement official Chen Yixin was also appointed to manage local efforts against the epidemic.

Every part of Beijing’s messaging is designed to “deflect from the centre: failings at the local level, the heroism of medical staff, the resilience and unity of the Chinese people in the face of great difficulties”, Jonathan Sullivan, a China expert from the University of Nottingham, said.

In Hubei, local Red Cross leaders had also come under fire on Weibo for allegedly mismanaging donations of masks and other medical supplies.

Authorities reacted quickly, sacking the local Red Cross Vice-President Zhang Qin for dereliction of duty.

China must “dare to criticise” those who fail to carry out official orders, and dereliction of duty “shall be punished according to discipline and law”, Xi said in a February 3 speech published by State media yesterday.

“Vividly describe touching deeds on the epidemic control and prevention frontline,” Xi also urged.

“Let positive energy fill the cyberspace from start to end.”

The Government, he said, must “strengthen the management and control of online media”, and “crack down on those who seize the opportunity to create rumours” on the Internet.

Simultaneously, “it is necessary to increase use of police force and strengthen the visible use of police”, Xi said, calling for a crackdown on behaviour that “disrupts social order” including hoarding medical supplies.

The death of Li Wenliang, a whistle-blowing doctor punished in January by Wuhan police for sending text messages about the illness, prompted a national outpouring of grief and anger that Beijing was quick to redirect towards local officials.

The 34-year-old, who died after contracting the virus from a patient, was mourned on Weibo, but his death also triggered calls for freedom of speech and the downfall of the Communist Party.

Within hours, however, hashtags and posts related to free speech disappeared from the platform.

Two open letters, including one signed by 10 professors in Wuhan, were circulated on social media days later but were quickly removed by censors.

At the same time, the central government announced that it would send a team to Wuhan to investigate how Li’s case had been handled.

State media and officials sought to paint Li as a hero who was part of a “joint” battle against the epidemic.

Chinese ambassador to Britain Liu Xiaoming denied in a BBC interview that “Chinese authorities” had punished Li, emphasising it was local authorities who had done so.

“Let’s win battle against novel coronavirus for deceased Doctor Li,” the People’s Daily, the Communist Party mouthpiece, urged readers.

Other individuals have also been singled out by State media and Government representatives as heroes, usually for making massive individual sacrifices.

State news agency Xinhua highlighted on Tuesday 87-year-old Ni Suying, a woman from Chongqing in the south-west, who had donated 30 years’ savings to help fight the epidemic.

“Salute to these angels!#EverydayHero,” reads a tweet by the People’s Daily showing nurses with marks and sores on their faces left by the masks they have worn during hours of duty.

The focus on individual sacrifice “obscures the State’s failure to discharge its duty to provide public safety”, Ling Li, a lecturer in Chinese politics at the University of Vienna, said.

aTear-jerking “hero” stories distract from a “rational understanding of the causal link between the mess of a crisis and the origin of the crisis”, Li told AFP.

But there are signs the tolerance for public criticism of officials is beginning to end.

Multiple people took to Weibo last week to complain that they had been permanently locked out of their WeChat accounts for allegedly spreading misinformation, after posting about the epidemic on the popular social media app.

The officials brought in to replace the sacked Hubei leaders have strong backgrounds in security, “hinting at the emphasis on maintaining stability”, Sullivan told AFP.

At the start, “the flow of information coming out from citizens and Chinese journalists was too abundant to contain”, Sullivan said.

Now, “an element of narrative control has been re-established”, he said.

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Eating your way to an early grave

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A 20-year analysis published in 2019 revealed that one in five people who die every year dies as the direct result of what they continue to eat or poor food choices. These numbers include medical-related deaths and deaths as a result of old age, vehicular accidents, homicides, and more.

Nevertheless, there is one binding truth for most people — whether young, old, slim, or fat — they don’t care how much pain, sickness, mutilation, or death their eating causes them or their children.

There is indeed great public interest in weight loss among the overweight, even among the slightly overweight. However, the great majority of this interest is vanity-related, leaving them susceptible to easy, extreme and quick fad diets. Naturally, because their mindset towards food, knowledge, behaviour patterns, and habituations have not changed, they soon regain all or more of the weight lost.

Many of us have heard of what has now been proven to improve quality of life and reduce the chances of illness, suffering and early death:

• Reduced calories;

• Fibre-based diet mainly consisting of vegetables, fruits, berries, seeds, legumes, nuts, spices;

• Minimised simple carbs, unhealthy fats, red meats, and processed foods;

• Reduced alcohol consumption;

• Elimination of tobacco consumption;

• Reduced stress;

• Increased stress management and meditation;

• Increased social relationships and hobbies;

• Improved time management;

• Increased physical and mental health awareness and support;

• Increased wellness, fact-based knowledge;

• Sleep management;

• Varied regular and consistent exercises and movements for strength, health and lifestyle reinforcement.

However, most people still do not care. We still clamour for cheap, low-quality, convenient food options, defending these choices with our very lives. Some food-involved ailments include: Stress, depression, acne, anxiety, dementia, fatigue, swellings and inflammation, back pains, joint pains, regular illnesses, chronic illnesses, headaches, gastrointestinal ailments, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, type 2 diabetes, cancers, blindness, stroke and more. And, of course, early death.

 

All these illnesses are being observed in increasing numbers among the young, slim and overweight.

By age group, the highest relative death rate increase — a jump of 29 per cent from 2010 to 2017 — is among people 25 to 34 years old.

People born in 1990 have twice the risk of colon cancer compared to a person born in 1950, and four times the risk of rectal cancer.

Of course, weight still matters. A 2018 study published in JAMA Oncology found that women in their 20s to 40s who were overweight had twice the risk of developing colorectal cancer before age 50.

Nevertheless, parents continue to feed their children foods which are commonly known to be damaging, often in the name of convenience.

Sadly, I cannot count the number of people who have told me that they are struggling with their life-improving weight loss diet because they have and must prepare unhealthier foods in their household for their children. Think about that for a moment.

 

Even after health threat, people refuse to change

We know that secondary prevention and lifestyle changes after life-threatening events or diagnoses can save lives, however, a recent peer-reviewed study (published in final, edited form as Health Rep 2012 Dec; 23(4): 49–53), revealed that “people rarely made positive changes in lifestyle behaviours after they had been diagnosed with a chronic condition”.

Another research paper showed “90 per cent of people with heart failure don’t make lifestyle changes”. The four doctor-recommended changes examined in this study included:

1. Monitoring weight changes;

2. Exercising more;

3. Regulating fluids; and

4. Reducing salt intake.

 

You can change

It is a fact that people are willing to die to eat what they want, that people don’t functionally care about the sickness. Most people fail to appreciate that it’s not just fighting fat.

In fact, many people would love to figure out how to eat and not get fat, while they eat their way to an early death — spending their hard-earned money on damaging foods in deadly portions.

While it is true that you are affected by marketing, food availability, stressors, triggers, social pressures, work demands, cultural influences, inherited primitive behavioural patterns, cravings and habituations, there comes a point where the better-minded version of you must look objectively at the painful future, which the misguided choices you are making every day will bring to you and your loved ones.

Hopefully this will help you become aware of the need for change — don’t waste time in contemplation. Change takes time, it is a process but it can only happen if you start. Do you want to change?

 

Fitz-George Rattray is the director of Intekai Academy, which is focused on helping people live a healthy lifestyle through nutrition and weight management. If you are interested in losing weight or living a healthier lifestyle, give them a call at 876-863- 5923, or visit their website at intekaiacademy.org.

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