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Haiti – Politic : Commissioning of modern sanitary blocks in 3 schools

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Haiti – Politic : Commissioning of modern sanitary blocks in 3 schools
21/01/2020 09:36:17

Haiti - Politic : Commissioning of modern sanitary blocks in 3 schools

Commissioning ceremonies of modern sanitary blocks for the benefit of students were held at the École Foyer Chrétien in Sarasin, Lycée Jean-Jacques Dessalines and Lycée Marie Jeanne.

The realization of these health infrastructures is part of a project to build 66 modern sanitary blocks in schools, markets and public places throughout the national territory, within the framework of the policy of modernization advocated by President Moïse.

These sanitary blocks are divided into two (girls and boys). The access is arranged to allow people with reduced mobility to easily meet their needs and a space is provided for hand washing.

The water supply is carried out as appropriate, either through the network of the National Directorate of Drinking Water and Sanitation (DINEPA) or through a borehole (well).

In order to ensure the proper management of these sanitary blocks, a memorandum of understanding has been signed between DINEPA and the Directors of educational establishments.

HL/ HaitiLibre

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How Delta Force prepared to invade Haiti right after Black Hawk Down

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0800 local Mogadishu, Somalia.

The pipe-hitters are all jammed into a small masonry room in the airport terminal building ready to sort of hear the morning intel report from New York Sam. NY Sam was born in Lebanon, and raised in one of the Burroughs of NYC, though I am loath to admit I don’t recall which.

NY Sam was as Arab-looking as they come, and ripped like crazy as physiques go for intel weenies. I’ll venture to say that NY Sam got rudimentary respect just for that reason from the pipe-hitters. That and the fact that he was smart as hell and didn’t take crap at any level. And then there was his thicker-than-thick New York accent that served to intimidate somewhat.

The intel briefs were really such a wash; the noise was so, so, so overwhelming. Just outside on the tarmac were American C5A heavy transports aircraft, Russian Antonov heavy transports, C-130 Combat Talons, and AC-130 Spectre gunships. None of them ever shut down their engines; they just screamed nonstop like banshees ALL THE TIME!

They were not allowed to shut down because of the threat of indirect fire from downtown metropolitan Mogadishu. The Skinnies routinely dropped mortars on us whenever they thought they had figured out how to aim their tubes; that is, without either moving them closer in or farther back to find their range. The transports landed, off-loaded, and flew away as fast as they could. Nobody wanted another Khe Sanh.

KC-130H burns on the Khe Sanh combat base airstrip after impacts from mortar fire.

“We should fuck with them and keep moving the airport back and forth,” suggested Samuel Booth Foster from my own five-man assault team that only ever had four men.

Chill-D just blinked at Samuel, thinking him to be a miscreant for suggesting that one could indeed move an entire airport back and forth just to confuse some Somali gunners. He only thanked his lucky stars that he had NOT been born with the same mental deficit that Samuel Foster had.

“A four-man assault team was better than five men anyway…” Sam had once postulated, “…we won’t be stuck with that awkward odd-man-out when it comes to ballroom dancing.”

“Yeah but… when the hell are we ever going to do that???” Chill-D asked in a grating tone. Chill-D was a top-shelf operator, he just didn’t process some humor or rhetoric well.

Ah, and then there was omnipresent whopping of the MH-60 Blackhawk rotor blades that wore me out the most. They were alert birds with engines always running ready to lift off with a band of intensely pissed-off pipe-hitters as soon as our counter-battery radar backtraced the trajectory of the latest mortar round. They were armed with the basis of some stellar ROE: “Kick ass — repeat!”

All of those noise contributions made New York Sam nearly impossible to hear/understand. Everyone in the room kept eyes locked on NY Sam’s screaming mouth to try to collect some vestige of lip-reading intelligence to supplement their pallid audio input. It was easy to drift off on a daydream until perked up by something NY Sam said.

“Did I hear NY Sam right? Did he mention Haiti in there just now?”

“Yeah… he’s been mentioning Haiti for two days now, asshole!”

“Woah, woah, woah… one war at a time! We’re not finished with this Somalia war — can we please finish our Somalia war before we move onto the Haiti war?”

Well, business was booming was all I could think of. The prospect of flying direct to Haiti from Somalia was pretty real. In fact, our intel messages from New York Sam had drifted completely away from anything about Somalia at all to favoring Haiti. We had gone from an effort to capture Muhammad Aideed, to screw “Aideed we just want our pilot Michael Durant back.” Now that we had Mike back there was really no further interest in the shit hole that was Mogadishu.

“Skinnies are Skinnies,” Samuel Foster remarked every time I lamented the operations’ tempo. I got that; he was saying that target profiles from Somalia to Haiti were essentially the same. To a guy like me, his remark was shocking in the manner that it dehumanized the persons we were targeting. To a sociopath like Sam Foster, it was just a business model.

(L-R) men of Haiti and men of Somalia

Don’t get me wrong… not all sociopaths are sadistic serial killers; in fact, I envied not being a sociopath in Delta. How pleasant would it be to eliminate all my internal human struggles and be able to pop a person in the head or pop a zit with equal priority and absence of emotional baggage! I recognized, thoroughly devoid of any pretense, that Samuel Foster was the better man for Delta than I: he was a man with absolutely zero fear or compunction.

New York Sam was damned-near exhausted when he was finished with the day’s intel shout. He just retired to his plywood intel shop to sip soothing liquids for the remainder of the day. Us pipe-slingers bellied up to planning tables and cobbled together outrageous spitballs and what-ifs for the afternoon. It was a thing we were inclined to do where there were such cavernous gaps in the intelligence preparation of the battlespace (IPB).

“There’s nothing to do, but we’re going to do something anyway,” remarked my Troop Sergeant (dare I introduce yet another to the narrative) Sam J., who just went by his callsign “Slammer.” And could there be a more palpable coincidence in mentioning that Slammer was also from Lebanon and grew up in the States?

“I wonder if Slammer and New York Sam knew each other as babies in Lebanon,” Samuel Foster remarked once, a thing that Chill-D simply couldn’t process as you know:

“What are the FREAKING ODDS, Sam, that those two in an entire country could have known each other, and how well could they have known anyone being just little babies?!? Chill-D roared! Samuel just stared at him with a blank face, totally satisfied with the rile he had just provoked in Chill-D.

“We have an assignment finally,” Slammer began, (pointing to a structure on the Haiti map). “This warehouse has at least two armored fighting vehicles — likely three — maintained by forces loyal to François “Papa Doc” Duvalier. We are going to take them — best-case scenario — or take them out — worst case. We have to get in that warehouse undetected from an LCC (Last Covered and Concealed safe location) — ideas? Ok, ok… laugh it up guys; go ahead and get it alll out. When you’re done, I want ideas.

A French Nexter Aravis Armored Fighting Vehicle (AFV) of the type expected to be found in the warehouse in Port au Prince, Haiti.

(laughter dies down giving way to awkward silence)

“Foster!”

“Well, Geo speaks that chicken-scratching turd-fuck creole-pidgin-patois mumbo-jumbo language, doesn’t he? He can go in ahead of us and explain that we are a traveling remake of the Glenn Miller Jazz orchestra.”

“Ok, alright I said hold it down, guys… I MEAN IT, GODDAMNIT!!”

The room jerked to a halt; when Slammer got to his “Goddamnit phase” we knew the party was over and it was time to go to school. Slammer was not a swearing man but he could at least look like one when he got really steamed.

“Geo!”

“Duuuuh… ummm… ( hail Mary full of grace, the Lord is with thee…) guayabera shirts, Slammer.”

“Gwaya-hooya-what’s?

“Guayabera shirts, Slammer… they are those ugly, wispy, cotton, collard button-downs that nearly every man in the Caribbean wears — Cubans, Puerto Ricans… HAITIANS!”

Slammer looked at me blankly for what seemed like the longest-ass time, but sorted it out nicely:

“Ok, that’s at least a start. We do at a very minimum need to be able to pass a cursory glance inspection, so we need to sport the local garb — logistics will get on it.”

The famous Guayabera Shirt

“They’re reasonable too, Slammer, at just about $17.00 per shirt. Some of them have four pockets on the front too, plus they are light and airy in tropical climates!”

“No shit, geo… no shit just $17.00 a shirt — really?”

Sam’s face — by the countenance it held — informed me the ice beneath my feet was thawing rapidly.

In the first afternoon we had figured out prime, second, and tertiary routes to and from the warehouse from our tentative LCCs. We had vehicle quantities, personnel loads by name, and some broad-brush actions on the assault objectives. Carl Gustaf 84mm Recoilless Rifles and thermite grenades-o-plenty were the star performers in our plans. I say, our plan was certainly to own them and turn them on Papa-Doc’s own boys, but if we couldn’t have them then nobody could, cuz we were just vindictive like that.

The devastating 84mm Carl Gustaf recoilless anti-tank rifle. (photo courtesy Sgt. Benjamin Tuck/Released)

We even realized that our own terminal building at the Mogadishu airport mimicked the warehouse in Port au Prince, Haiti, where “our” armored vehicles were stationed. We used it to rehearse — minus the guayabera shirts — actions on the assault objective several times.

A military thermite hand grenade

The last day of the last 0800 intel brief with New York Sam came. Slammer, Samuel, and I sat together waiting for it to begin as NY Sam glanced over his notes. Something was wrong; something just wasn’t quite right — something was drastically different. In fact, it was as quiet as a pin in there; you could hear a mouse drop. No howling jet engines, no jackhammering rotor whops-whops — nothing!

Operations in Mogadishu had come to an end, and we were merely transient baggage waiting to be hauled away. The transports were gone and the Hawks were silent. All that was left was New York Sam — the Lebanese, muscle-ripped, heavily accented by the Burroughs Sam. Satisfied with his scan of his notes he looked up at us and, heavily punctuated by his no-nonsense affect, he moved his mouth in the usual screaming fashion… but made no sound!

…and the room howled with laughter.

By Almighty God and with honor,
geo sends

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La Paz and Santa Cruz de la Sierra Develop Urban Resilience with World Bank Support

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Leaders in Haiti must step up and end the political impasse between President Jovenel Moïse and a surging opposition movement that has paralyzed the island nation since July 2018, the top UN official there said on Thursday in a briefing to the UN Security Council in New York.

UN Special Representative Helen La Lime updated ambassadors on latest
developments in the prolonged divide which has left Haiti without a functioning
government, deflated the economy, and fueled insecurity. 

“Haiti is about to enter in its second year with a caretaker government,
its economy is forecast to sink deeper into recession, and 4.6 million of its
citizens are now estimated to require humanitarian assistance,” she said,
speaking via videoconference from the capital, Port-au-Prince. 

“To avoid a greater deterioration, Haitian leaders need to rise to the
occasion and commit to a way out of this impasse that will best serve the
interests of their people.” 

Threat of prolonged stalemate 

Ms. La Lime was introducing the first report on the UN Integrated
Office in Haiti, which she heads.

Known by the French acronym BINUH, it was
stablished last October, following the end of 15 years of UN peacekeeping
operations.   

Its mandate includes strengthening political stability and good
governance. 

During the past months, Ms. La Lime and international partners the
Organization of American States and the Holy See have been supporting
negotiations to forge consensus on a political agreement.  

However, talks failed to yield progress on the formation of a new
government and the designation of a “consensual” Prime Minister by the
President. 

“The lack of agreement on this matter, as well as on the remaining
length of President Moïse’s term, threatens to needlessly prolong a situation
that has already lasted too long,” she told the Council. 

‘Rising tide of cruelty’ 

In the interim, Haitians are being subjected to widespread human
rights violations as armed gangs now control around a third of the country,
generating “a rising tide of cruelty,” according to Marie Yolène Gilles,
Executive Director of the non-profit Fondasyon Je Klere, who also spoke from
the capital city. 

“We have witnessed odious killings, decapitations, rapes, robberies,
embezzlement and the diversion of supplies, abductions and kidnappings,” she
reported, later adding “we have death squadrons, and that’s a form of state
terrorism.” 

As Ms. La Lime told ambassadors, the ongoing impasse and economic
troubles risk further affecting the integrity of the national police and other
key institutions. 

New chapter in UN collaboration 

Haiti’s modern history has been characterized by recurring cycles of
political and socio-economic crisis. 

They have been rooted in factors such as poverty, gender inequalities,
limited access to basic services, natural resource depletion, gang activity,
corruption and impunity, said Ms. La Lime. 

While the road to improved governance will be difficult, the deployment
of the new UN office should see deeper and more targeted collaboration with the
country, she said. 

Success will be measured by progress in six areas.  Besides
facilitating political consensus, strengthening the police and justice sectors,
and addressing unemployment and other grievances, benchmarks also focus on
addressing gang violence and promoting human rights. 

“Only through a combination of strong national will and steadfast
international support can Haiti surmount the multifaceted crisis with which it
is contending,” said Ms. La Lime. 

“I remain confident that the United Nations, in its new configuration,
is uniquely placed to help State institutions address the factors that catalyze
cyclical periods of instability in the country and ensure that Haiti is once
again on the path to stability and sustainable development.” 

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Mourinho Says Tottenham Have the Worst Injury Problems in Europe – The Haitian Times

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Photo Credit: Bleacher Report

Tottenham Hotspur
manager Jose Mourinho has said his club have the worst injury problems in
Europe after seeing top scorers Harry Kane and Heung-Min Son sidelined.

“The position is
so, so, so specific and it’s very difficult to find an adaptation for the
striker position. If you lose four right-backs, you play [Oliver] Skipp or
[Moussa] Sissoko right-back. If you lose centre backs you can play, [Eric] Dier
or [Ben] Davies centre-back.

“The specificity
of the striker position is very difficult. You cannot say Davinson Sanchez go
play centre-forward. That’s the way it is. We have to go to game with
everything we have.

“The situation is difficult. Nobody else in the Premier League, for sure, but even in European football is in such a difficult situation as we are in terms of injuries in specific positions. It was really hard for the boys to be in this position.”

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The Haitian Times was founded in 1999 as a weekly English language newspaper based in Brooklyn, NY.The newspaper is widely regarded as the most authoritative voice for Haitian Diaspora.

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Mauro Icardi & Agent Wanda Nara Wouldn’t Mind Inter Return – The Haitian Times

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Photo Credit: Sempreinter

Mauro Icardi and his
wife, and agent, Wanda Nara would not mind returning to Inter at the end of the
season but Inter have other ideas about his future.

Icardi is currently
out on loan at French outfit Paris Saint Germain who have an option to buy him
for €70 million but as per the report, Icardi will ultimately have the final
say as he will get to make a decision if PSG activate that option.

PSG sporting director Leonardo wants to take up the option, much to the delight of Inter who will receive a huge boost to their transfer kitty if PSG do sign him.

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The Haitian Times was founded in 1999 as a weekly English language newspaper based in Brooklyn, NY.The newspaper is widely regarded as the most authoritative voice for Haitian Diaspora.

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Bethel graduate gives 100% of his nonprofit’s donations to projects around the world

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After witnessing a boy’s life in Haiti transform with just $5, Shane O’Rourke began to see money with a new perspective.

It started when O’Rourke was standing in line to buy a caramel macchiato shortly after graduation from Bethel University. It hit him that the amount he paid for this one cup of coffee was enough to change a life for the better.

He thought back to that boy, whom he met in Haiti when he volunteered with a Christian nonprofit. The boy, kicked out of school for losing his only pair of shoes, was on the brink of losing his sole source of nutrition from school lunches — and his education.

So O’Rourke gave the boy shoes that cost $5 and he stayed in school. O’Rourke felt determined to let people know how something so small can make a huge difference. That desire laid the foundation for O’Rourke’s Hopkins-based nonprofit, Lift Up, founded in 2018.

Lift Up partners with organizations around the world, aiding projects like digging a water well in Uganda and fixing a school roof in Honduras. Currently, Lift Up has 16 project partners.

Before being undertaken, each project must go through a 12-step certification process to ensure that it is “tangible, high impact, a significant need and sustainable,” said O’Rourke, 28.

One hundred percent of donations go toward the projects, O’Rourke said. The nonprofit even covers credit card fees.

“[Donors] see the purity of the model because we’re putting our own skin in the game,” he said.

O’Rourke graduated from Bethel in 2014 with a major in missional ministry and a minor in business.

He also launched Lift Up with a website — weliftup.org — set up for free by creative boutique Bionic Giant.

The nonprofit’s first project was building a basketball court for kids in Haiti and O’Rourke has traveled to Haiti five times. But the mission has expanded rapidly in scope.

Since launching, Lift Up has raised more than $300,000 for 24 projects helping more than 29,000 people. Donors are known as “lifters;” if they choose to give monthly, they become “heavy lifters.”

“[Donors] get to choose what they’re passionate about,” he said. “So, it’s an à la carte menu of tangible projects.”

After accompanying O’Rourke to Haiti, co-founder Tyler Layman jumped on board.

“It really means a lot to me that we have this ability,” Layman, 40, said. “Shane reminds me a lot of myself when I was his age in that he is just full of ideas, amazing ideas.”

As part of making the projects’ impact visible to willing givers, the website features photos, videos and locations for projects, and lays out exactly how many people would be helped per a dollar amount. For example, the water well project in Uganda costs around $8,500 and would help 5,200 people — for about $5, three people would be helped.

Funding per project is also tracked live, said O’Rourke, who works full time for his father’s insurance agency, the O’Rourke Agency, Inc.

But the effort is not without operating expenses. So the nonprofit created a fund called “the CORE” — covering operational recurring expenses. Corporate partners or private donors can support this fund to allow the business to sustain itself, covering costs like transaction fees and branding.

Looking ahead, O’Rourke plans to expand corporate sponsorships, pursue larger projects and update the website so that “lifters,” companies and project partners can have their own profiles for tracking funds, he said.

O’Rourke and his wife, Gabi, have gone to Haiti together and plan to bring their 4-month-old son, Brecken, once he gets a bit older, O’Rourke said.

“It’s just been a journey of learning about it, experiencing it and then realizing there’s something I can do about it,” O’Rourke said.

“I’ve got everything I need and more. And there’s kids right now that can’t get clean water.”

Caitlin Anderson (caitlin.anderson@startribune.com) is a University of Minnesota student on assignment for the Star Tribune.

 

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