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Youth climate activists whose work goes beyond international protests

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Grim scientific reports say the planet is headed for rising temperatures, rising seas, rising drought. But the young people who will inherit the Earth are taking action. They are motivated by hope – hope in humanity to have the intelligence and determination to address this era’s existential threat, and hope that any one individual’s involvement is a key factor in moving the whole world forward.

Four young activists living very different realities – in Japan, Senegal, India, and Haiti – are all making climate action a central purpose in their lives.

“We young people have had enough of the excuses,” says Vivianne Roc, whose group works with young women in Haiti. She says she is keenly aware that a small organization on a small island nation can’t do much to solve or even mitigate climate change. “Haiti didn’t cause climate change, it’s up to them” – world leaders, she says – “to take the big steps that are necessary.”

“But seeing young people’s frustrations transformed into involvement and action gives me hope. It allows me,” she adds, “to put on a little smile when it may not feel like there’s a lot to smile about.”

When the teenage Danish climate activist Greta Thunberg arrived by solar-powered boat in New York last September to speak before the United Nations General Assembly, she garnered so much attention that the world might have thought her youthful climate activism must be something unusual.

Actually it’s not, and not by a long shot.

All over the world, in big cities and small villages, in developed and still-developing countries, in global powers and tiny island nations, young people are mobilizing and marching, as seen in Friday’s global climate strike. Beyond that, young people are starting their own organizations and innovating greener everyday-living practices, all in the name of addressing climate change.

Motivated by increasingly grim scientific reports on where the planet is headed – rising temperatures, rising seas, rising drought – and by the reality that they will be inheriting the Earth, young people are taking action.

But to speak with just about any of these young activists is to realize that they are also motivated by hope – hope in humanity to have the intelligence and determination to address this era’s existential threat, and hope that their own role, that any individual’s involvement, is a key factor in moving the whole world forward.

As Vivianne Roc, a health and environmental education activist in Haiti says, “We young people have had enough of the excuses. But seeing young people’s frustrations transformed into involvement and action gives me hope. It allows me,” she adds, “to put on a little smile when it may not feel like there’s a lot to smile about.”

Here are four young climate activists living very different realities around the world – in Japan, Senegal, India, and Haiti – but all making climate action a central purpose in their lives.

Howard LaFranchi/The Christian Science Monitor

Mayumi Sato, founder of Landscape Narratives, at the United Nations in New York. She coordinates photography projects in Brazil, Guam, Mexico, and Southeast Asia, “encouraging climate action by transcending language through imagery,” she says.

Mayumi Sato got the idea of using images to change thinking and build empathy around climate change from talking with her grandmother in Japan.

For a while, it seemed as if all climate conversations with her grandmother devolved into arguments, Ms. Sato says. “But then I realized that when I showed her pictures, things changed,” she says. “If you can attribute a face or an image to the community you’re talking about, it personalizes the problems, the issues they are facing.”

“With my grandmother,” she adds, “I realized the images served as an entry point to a conversation.”

That realization led Ms. Sato to found Landscape Narratives, a global photography project that helps communities affected by climate change to tell their story through images. She now has “teams” in Brazil and Guam, is assisting a friend in Mexico focused on the climate activism of an LGBTQ community, and has launched projects based on her own travels throughout Southeast Asia. Each project focuses on “encouraging climate action by transcending language through imagery,” she says.

In northern Thailand, Ms. Sato photographed the farmers and children whose livelihoods and health are undermined by the uncontrolled burning of plastics. In Cambodia, she took portraits of women taking climate action into their own hands.

Ms. Sato, who did her university studies at McGill University in Montreal and speaks English fluently, says a key motivating desire for her was to create a way of communicating the human impact of climate change without the limitation of language.

“I know English is the universal language, … but photography is a kind of universal language, too,” she says. “So my goal is to use imagery that truly everyone can relate to, and to help spread the understanding that a changing climate isn’t abstract, it’s already affecting people and places around the world.”

Howard LaFranchi/The Christian Science Monitor

Ndéye Marie Aïda Ndiéguène used about 2,000 old tires, 3,000 liter bottles, and 1,000 plastic sacks in her award-winning design of a storehouse to mitigate farmers’ crop losses in Senegal. She aims to create jobs for young people, and take concrete steps to solve local problems.

Ndéye Marie Aïda Ndiéguène thinks youth-dominated climate demonstrations are great.

But the young civil engineer, entrepreneur, and budding novelist from Dakar, Senegal, says it’s important for young people not just to demonstrate but to do something. By that she means pitch in to develop the solutions, both large and small, to the global climate challenge.

It was that conviction that led Ms. Ndiéguène to develop a new model of barn or storehouse that addresses two critical problems at once: It uses materials like old tires, and plastic sacks and bottles, that traditionally are burned or find their way into landfills or waterways and the sea; and it reduces the high rates of crop loss that require Senegalese small farmers to produce more and more, just to squeak by.

“Originally our motivation was primarily to address the farmers’ very high crop loss, but we quickly realized that we could also play a part in addressing climate change by developing a new crop storage space,” says Ms. Ndiéguène, who is proud to call herself the CEO of Eco-Builders MS (for “Made in Senegal.”)

The prototype storehouse, which has won Eco-Builders a number of innovation prizes, used about 2,000 old tires, 3,000 liter bottles, and 1,000 large plastic sacks.

Noting that Eco-Builders’ aim is to create jobs for local young people to both gather the building materials and then carry out the construction, Ms. Ndiéguène returns to her theme of taking concrete steps to solve local problems.

“I think what Greta [Thunberg] is doing is so important, but I also think it’s just the first step in the youth climate movement,” she says. “I want to use my skills as an entrepreneur because to me, while it’s important to talk about the problems, it’s also important to come up with the solutions.”

Courtesy of Vishnu PR Purusothaman.

Vishnu P.R. Purushothaman (center) and his wife, Athira G, receive a certificate from a district administrator in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala state, India, after their “green wedding” highlighted their climate change work. Mr. Purushothaman says that his young volunteers “want to do real things that have real impact.”

When Vishnu P.R. Purushothaman got married last summer, the principles of sustainable living were so important to him that he and his wife-to-be agreed to have a green wedding.

The couple’s clever use of local materials like bamboo and banana in the place of plastics earned them a “green couple” designation from the district administrator. And it led to a new revenue source for the climate action nonprofit Mr. Purushothaman runs in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala.

The nonprofit C5 – it stands for Change Can Change Climate Change – aims to raise awareness about steps everyone can take to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Now it also helps couples plan their own green weddings.

Mr. Purushothaman says the small army of 10,000 volunteers – virtually all of whom are younger than his 29 years – is proof that young people are serious about addressing climate change.

“Kids around the world are really scared about their future, and that is driving them to all these marches, but for many of them that’s not enough,” he says. “They want to do real things that have real impact, and so at C5 we are trying to exploit that drive to do real things.”

One focus of C5 is waste management. Young people go door to door explaining how households can do their part to reduce carbon emissions and help create a sustainable environment.

Mr. Purushothaman says C5 has the advantage of being in Kerala state, which boasts India’s highest literacy rate and a long tradition of social activism.

“People in Kerala are generally aware that things have to change now if we don’t want the very worst to happen concerning climate change,” he says. “The kids who go out into the communities generally find this level of awareness, and that gives us all hope that people can change, and so what we’re doing serves a purpose.”

Howard LaFranchi/The Christian Science Monitor

Vivianne Roc is founder of an organization called Plurielles, which seeks to integrate climate action into efforts to address public health issues and other challenges in Haiti, mainly through working with young women.

Haiti has long sat near the very bottom of international rankings of countries by prosperity, human development, and good governance. And while that discouraging picture may deflate many Haitians, for Vivianne Roc it’s a motivating factor.

“In Haiti we face an ensemble of daunting problems, and now with climate change added to the mix,” says the founder and president of Plurielles, an organization that seeks to integrate climate action into efforts to address public health issues and other challenges, mainly through working with young women.

“I want my future and that of other young people to be much better, and indeed better for a wider number of people,” says Ms. Roc. “So that’s why we are making climate action an integral part of our work, because climate change has the potential to set back any progress we make in health or living conditions.”

Plurielles aims to break what Ms. Roc calls “very negative syndromes” in Haiti through educating young women and promoting healthier life practices. As examples of those “negative syndromes” she cites high teen pregnancy and Haiti’s disastrous deforestation – two challenges she says may not seem related but which both pose dire consequences for the prospects of Haiti’s youth.

Ms. Roc says she is keenly aware that a small organization on a small island nation in the Caribbean can’t do much to solve or even mitigate climate change. “Haiti didn’t cause climate change, it’s up to them” – world leaders, she says – “to take the big steps that are necessary.”

But she says the action of individuals like the young women she works with in Plurielles is nevertheless crucial, because it allows people to feel a part of something bigger, something global.

“If people feel they matter, that gives them hope,” she says. “And we’re not going to do the things we must to solve our problems if we don’t have hope.” 

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UN Chief Urges Haitians to Resist Escalation at Quake Event

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UNITED NATIONS — Secretary-General Antonio Guterres used a U.N. ceremony Friday marking the 10th anniversary of the devastating Haiti earthquake to urge Haitians to resolve differences through dialogue and “resist any escalation that could reverse the gains of the past decade.”

The U.N. chief told about 200 staff members and diplomats at U.N. headquarters that “insecurity and slow economic growth are contributing to rising social tensions and a deteriorating humanitarian situation” in Haiti.

The Western Hemisphere’s poorest nation has been roiled by street protests and economic stagnation for much of President Juvenal Moise’s nearly three years in office. Opposition leaders have demanded his departure, accusing him of mismanaging the economy and failing to tackle corruption.

Guterres said the 7.0 magnitude quake that hit Haiti’s capital and surrounding area Jan. 12, 2010, “created serious new threats to Haiti’s security, stability and prosperity.”

He said the United Nations “deeply regrets the loss of life and suffering caused by the cholera epidemic” that researchers say was introduced to Haiti’s most important river system in October 2010 by Nepalese soldiers serving in a U.N. peacekeeping mission. The epidemic has sickened over 800,000 Haitians and killed more than 9,000.

Guterres said the United Nations is “also committed to resolving pending cases of sexual exploitation and abuse” by U.N. peacekeepers in Haiti.

The earthquake’s estimated death toll ranges from around 100,000 to more than 300,000 people.

A decade later, thousands of Haitians still don’t have adequate shelter, and the long-term quake response is widely seen as a failure by both the Haitian government and foreign governments and aid groups.

Among the earthquake’s casualties were 102 U.N. staff members from 30 countries, almost all buried in the rubble of the collapsed Hotel Christoper where the U.N. peacekeeping mission had its headquarters. The head of the U.N. mission, Hedi Annabi, and his deputy, Luis Carlos da Costa, were among the victims.

Friday’s ceremony took place in front of the mounted U.N. flag that once flew at the hotel. At the end, the secretary-general, senior U.N. officials, ambassadors and relatives of the victims each walked to the wreath in front of the flag and laid a white carnation in remembrance.

Before the ceremony, Guterres visited what he called “the moving new memorial” of the earthquake called “A Breath” by sculptor Davide Dormino that was transported from Haiti. He said he was particularly impressed that it included rubble from the Hotel Christopher.

Guterres said the U.N. staffers who died were in Haiti “to help build stability and prosperity and consolidate peace and security.” He renewed the U.N. commitment to honor their legacy by working alongside Haitians and their supporters to “safeguard Haiti’s future and build lives of peace, prosperity and dignity for all Haitians.”

Haitian diplomat Patrick Saint-Hilaire stressed that there is “much work left to be done” and said it is “not too late to take up the challenge of the complete reconstruction of Haiti.”

“We must not lose sight of the fact that our country remains very impoverished and as vulnerable to natural disasters as it is to human wrongdoing,” he said.

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Annual Benefit Dinner for Haiti Feb. 7

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New owners of the Damariscotta River Grill, Tim Beal and Tamara Dica, have confirmed that the Grill will again prepare the food for the annual Lincoln County Haiti Benefit Dinner to be held Feb. 7, at 6 p.m. at St. Patrick’s Church, 380 Academy Hill Rd. in Newcastle.

Since acquiring the Grill last year, Beal and Dica have established Tuesdays and Wednesdays as Neighbor Nights, offering an affordable tasting menu with 20% of proceeds going to selected local charities.

“We enjoy this opportunity to bring people from different organizations together and to make a concrete contribution to helping our neighbors. We think the Haiti Dinner will do the same thing — a helping hand to our neighbors in Haiti — and we are happy to contribute, “ says Beal.

The dinner will be Haitian themed and include typical Haitian snacks, creole chicken (a version with nuts and one without), rice and beans, salad with avocado, Haitian rum cake, Haitian punch (with or without rum) and Haitian coffee. The dinner will also feature Haitian painting, arts and crafts, and music.

Tickets are $25 for adults and $15 for children and are available at Skidompha Public Library, Sherman’s in Damariscotta and Boothbay Harbor. Tickets are available from members of the Lincoln County Ecumenical Committee for Haiti at these churches: St. Patrick’s and St. Andrew’s, and the Second Congregational in Newcastle; St. Giles; St. Denis, and the Wiscasset Congregational.

Proceeds from the dinner go directly to the northern Haitian town of Gros Morne where a local ecumenical committee determines the neediest recipients and most urgent projects.
This year the focus will be on food security, because of the growing cost and scarcity of food caused by the continuing political turmoil throughout Haiti. Dinners will have the ability to pledge support to projects involving hot school lunches for elementary kids, school books, uniforms, and supplies; chicken raising projects for poor women; and a new project to provide quality seeds to farmers. Pledging will be conducted by noted auctioneer John Bottero of Thomaston Place Galleries.

For more information, to volunteer, to join the Host Committee, or to make a contribution, please call Sharon Marchi at (207) 529-5239 or (207) 315-0969.

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10 Years Later: What Will Haitians On Temporary Protected Status In The U.S. Do Next?

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Sunday marks the 10-year anniversary of the magnitude-7.0 earthquake of 2010 that forever changed the lives of Haiti and its’ residents. The lingering effects of the catastrophic natural disaster afforded safety and stability for refugees in the U.S. However, those living in America under temporary protected status are facing another reality 10 years later as those protections are due to expire next year. The Haitians who were evacuated to the U.S. under TPS now have an elevated sense of urgency to obtain naturalization in the states.

SEE MORE: What To Know About The Temporary Protection Status For Haitians In The U.S.

On Nov. 1, it was announced by the Department of Homeland Security that the protective status for Haiti, as well as the other countries affected by the earthquake, will be extended until Jan. 4, 2021. Prior to this extension, the status was due to expire in January and March of 2020, according to The Haitian Times.

Haiti Earthquake 2010

Source: Haitian Times

Vania Andre, publisher of The Haitian Times, spoke with NewsOne about the uncertainty and fear that looms over the 50,000 Haitians that evacuated to the U.S., who now have to devise a plan as it pertains to their temporary status.

“I think the most important thing is to try to figure out how to get people to either become naturalized or find a way that they can help their relatives or their friends and family – find a way to have a permanent legal status here in the states,” Andre said.

She continued, “When you think about TPS and for the connection there – for me – it’s really first the T in TPS stands for ‘temporary.’ I don’t think that the goal should be one where we are looking to keep getting extensions. It really should be focused on how do we get people who have this status to get the natural permanent residency here – and what does that process look like. Part of that, that goes hand-in-hand, is really thinking about how to work with community partners on the ground to help get awareness campaigns out to the community.”

Andre noted that over the last few months, Haitian Americans have been trying to figure out the best way address the many political issues in Haiti while living in the U.S. Some are taking strides to become politically active in the states, which would possibly enable them to leverage power and influence “into how it could potentially help those in Haiti and the situation there.”

Others are riddled with fear about speaking up and becoming politically engaged due to the negative connotations that are typically aligned with immigration. Andre said there has to be a “hand-in-hand” partnership between Haitian-elected officials and those on protective status, as they are in positions to advocate for Haitians who are too afraid to voice their opinions.

Haiti Earthquake 2010

Source: Haitian Times

While many Haitians are looking to gain natural permanent residency in the midst of their status expiring, there will also be many who will face deportation, despite Haiti’s current conditions being similar to when the earthquake first struck. The scope of the country’s recovery is a focal point of a trial being held in New York City that will ultimately determine if the Trump administration can end TPS for Haitians in the U.S., VOA News reports.

The trial focused on emails that were shared between U.S. officials regarding the living conditions in Haiti. In an email from Oct. 2017, Trump-appointed Kathy Kovarik of the Department of Homeland Security said, “The problem is that it reads as though we’d recommend an extension (of TPS) because we talk so much about how bad it is.”

Another official responded to Kovarik and said, “The basic problem is that it IS bad there. We can … try to get more, and/or comb through the country conditions we have again looking for positive gems, but the conditions are what they are.”

To that point, Andre said that although it has been 10 years since the earthquake hit, Haiti is still recovering immensely. The country is still dealing issues such as cholera, famine, and other deplorable conditions.

“To be frank, the country is still recovering from the earthquake,” she said. “And even though that seems preposterous because it’s 10 years after, it’s still not where it should be and bringing these people back there is not necessarily an option that people would see as the best one.”

Haiti Earthquake 2010

Source: Haitian Times

Andre said that plans of action have to be constructed for both of the options that may present itself for Haitians in the U.S. – if they stay or if they have to leave. “On one breath, while I do say that the long-term goal has to be about thinking, how are we going to get these people permanent status here – legal status here? At the same time, it’s also understanding that there may very well be a situation where people do have to go back to Haiti. And even just thinking for those who are already there – who are there now – there has to be a way to think about where the country is at the moment,” she said.

Andre added that there is an interpersonal aspect of this situation that is often left out of the conversation.

“Thinking about mentally preparing yourself to understand that your life may look very different than it has for years prior,” she said. “Very little do we every really think about the emotional toll that it has on their day to day life. When you’re living with this burden of fear in your heart, it makes everything difficult.”

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Afro-Haitian Dance Concert Lives up to Department Legacy

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“A New Beginning” was the title of the annual winter concert presented by the African American (AFAM) Studies Department’s Afro-Haitian Dance program on December 19, 2019, in the Berkeley High School Community Theater.

The Afro-Haitian Dance program was initiated by the AFAM Studies Department in the early 1990s. At the time, the AFAM Studies Department was on the rise again under its chair, Robert McKnight, after years of contracting. Naomi Washington Diouf was hired to run the show. Diouf, known as “Mama” by her students, retired last year after a tenure of nearly 30 years, including several years as lead teacher of the AFAM Studies Department, a position now filled by Spencer Pritchard. “Mama leaving was really sad because we didn’t know what Afro-Haitian was without her,” said Berkeley Independent Study (IS) junior, Jasmine Meluu. Meluu added that Diouf “made the program what it is.” 

The new Afro-Haitian Dance teacher, Dr. Dawn Williams, used to teach Language and Leadership at the Berkeley Technology Academy. Meluu said, “Dr. Williams is really different [than] Mama.” Diouf’s co-teacher from past years, Tanzia Mucker — known to the students as Ms. Shorty — now serves as Williams’s co-teacher and artistic director of the program. Dr. Williams is “younger and isn’t as experienced but she’s learning really quickly from Ms. Shorty,” said Meluu. BHS senior Keyanna Hardison expressed similar sentiments, speaking to Dr. Williams’ efforts and Shorty’s experience. Dr. Williams “gives everyone just a big confidence boost when dancing,” Hardison said, “and Ms. Shorty our actual dance instructor set the pieces on us and is a big role model for us.”

This is Meluu’s third straight year of being in the Afro-Haitian Dance program. “It’s always been my favorite class [because] it’s a space to forget about all the other stress and anxiety in your life and just be free,” said Meluu. Hardison attributes the success of the program to the wonderful artistic environment that the class fosters. “One thing that Afro-Haitian is really big on is unity when dancing. Feeling one another and keeping up a spirit,” she said.

“We were all really nervous [about] our first performance without Mama because none of us knew what a performance was without her,” Meluu said. “Fortunately, everyone kinda banded together and we had one of the best performances I’ve been in, which says a lot,” she explained. In fact, Meluu said the piece her class opened with, called the “Spider Dance,” was new to them and turned out to be one of the hardest dances they had ever performed. Hardison said her favorite dance was “Kongo.” The performance showed that the program was relatively seamless, and proved once again the value of Afro-Haitian department in unifying a diverse group of students, keeping a unique dance style alive in Berkeley, and putting on an incredible show for hundreds of people. Meluu said, “Overall it was an amazing show and I’m super excited for the spring performance,” echoing the sentiment of many in attendance.  

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Kreyol Essence to Launch in Ulta Beauty Stores – The Haitian Times

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On Jan. 12, Kreyol Essence founders Yve-Car Momperousse and Stéphane Jean-Baptiste announced during their appearance on Shark Tank they will be launching in Ulta Beauty stores. The national chain of beauty stores will carry 12 SKUs of Kreyol Essence’s hair care products.

“We’re grateful to the Ulta team,” Momperousse said, during a viewing party for the episode. This is a “gamechanger for our community to be in [one] of the largest beauty retailers in the country. “

The natural hair, skin, and body brand also walked away with a deal from Kevin O’Leary aka Mr. Wonderful. Leary offered $400,000 for a royalty deal where he would earn in perpetuity 25 cents for every unit sold, plus 5% equity in Kreyol Essence.

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The Haitian Times was founded in 1999 as a weekly English language newspaper based in Brooklyn, NY.The newspaper is widely regarded as the most authoritative voice for Haitian Diaspora.

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Anti-Government Protesters In Haiti Vow To Resume Demonstrations In 2020

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In Haiti, opponents of the president say they’ll be back on the streets on New Year’s Day. Protesters took a break for the holidays after months of street demonstrations. Now they plan to return until their president leaves. NPR’s Carrie Kahn reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF HORNS HONKING)

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: At a Port-au-Prince gas station, Markenson Pierre fills up his mototaxi. These small motorcycles are the best at getting through the capital’s hellish traffic.

MARKENSON PIERRE: (Speaking Creole).

KAHN: “I use this old thing to make a living, to give my kids food and to pay for their school,” he says. But lately, after protesters took to the streets to demand President Jovenel Moise resign, he hasn’t been able to work, his kids haven’t gone to school, and food prices have skyrocketed. “I just want some stability in the country,” he says.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOTORCYCLE REVVING)

KAHN: Haiti is long used to political and economic crises, but observers say the latest clashes between the president and his opponents have brought suffering and dysfunction to new depth. Riots began last July after the government announced plans to hike gas prices. It didn’t follow through, but the protests have continued, with the last few months being some of the most violent. At least 55 people have died and more than 100 injured, according to the U.N.

HANS DESTOUCHES: And we spend, like, a month without getting gas, and when we receive it, it’s very little, you know?

KAHN: Hans Destouches manages this gas station in Petionville in the hills above the city. This one and another station closer to downtown have been repeatedly attacked during the demonstrations.

DESTOUCHES: You know, we just have the (ph) repaint because we had a car over there, you know, and they put fire on it.

KAHN: Right here?

DESTOUCHES: Right here.

KAHN: The burned-out car has been removed and the wall freshly painted during a break in the protests that lasted much of December. But demonstrators say they will be back New Year’s Day, Haiti’s Independence Day. They’re demanding investigations into the waste of billions of dollars of earthquake relief funds, and they want the president investigated for allegedly misappropriating aid from the Venezuela oil program known as PetroCaribe. President Moise denies any wrongdoing. Opposition leader Michel Andre says the president has lost all credibility.

MICHEL ANDRE: (Speaking French).

KAHN: “This corruption has made it impossible for the state to meet even the most basic needs of the people,” says Andre. The protests and roadblocks have crippled food distribution, especially outside the capital. Nearly 4 million Haitians are unable to reliably get food.

ANDRE: (Speaking French).

KAHN: “The Americans and the international community must stop supporting a president who can no longer run this country,” says Andre. Moise took office in 2017 after an election with only 21% turnout. His popularity has plummeted ever since. The U.S., though, remains committed to engaging with Moise as its democratically elected president. The State Department tells NPR the U.S. will support a Haitian-led solution to end the gridlock.

Earlier this month, the Vatican and the United Nations tried to bring both sides to the negotiating table. President Moise invited opponents to the National Palace before Christmas. All declined. As the political stalemate continues, human rights activist Marie Yolene Gilles says criminals and gangs are taking advantage of the power vacuum.

MARIE YOLENE GILLES: (Speaking Creole).

KAHN: “There is terrible sadness in Haiti now.” She says more than 100 gangs are operating on the island. Gilles, now 58, says she believes she will not see a fair and just Haiti in her lifetime.

But 29-year-old Emmanuela Douyon is part of a new phenomenon taking place in Haiti now that has young artists and professionals demanding clean government. She says she’s not giving up.

EMMANUELA DOUYON: If I have to leave Haiti because I can’t live here anymore, I have to at least try, and I have to give everything before giving up.

KAHN: Douyon says she will be back out on the streets in the New Year. Carrie Kahn, NPR News, Port-au-Prince. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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