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The Haiti Sentinel | In Haiti, US Undersecretary David Hale Snubbed by Opposition Leaders

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Undersecretary Hale was reported to be in Haiti to hold meetings aimed at establishing a government the U.S. could consider “legitimate”, before the end of 2019. A key group of the opposition, the Alternative Consensus, was requested to attend.

The opponents, invited, said they requested an agenda understanding of the terms of the meeting. Having not received the agenda, they declined the invitation for the meeting which would have taken place at the U.S. Embassy in Tabarre on Friday.

Opposition leaders are still expected to be in the vicinity of the embassy, however. A protest to the embassy is scheduled and Senator Youri Latortue (AAA – Artibonite), a member of the Alternative Consensus, will over to the U.S. American delegation a document summarizing their concerns and position on the situation in Haiti.

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Haiti – FLASH : 2020 scholarship for Taiwan, registration open

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Haiti – FLASH : 2020 scholarship for Taiwan, registration open
22/01/2020 08:30:45

Haiti - FLASH : 2020 scholarship for Taiwan, registration open

The Embassy of Taiwan (Republic of China) accredited in Haiti informs that registrations for the scholarship program entitled “MOFA Taiwan Scholarship Program” for the year 2020 have been open since Tuesday, January 21, 2020. Applicants must be under 23 years of age for Bachelor studies, and under 30 years of age for Master studies. All must have a good level of English and a good result in the BAC (baccalaureate) or a higher education diploma (no later than June of the current year).

The Embassy informs potential applicants that studies in Taiwan will be conducted mainly in Mandarin and that a first year of learning Mandarin is an integral part of the MOFA Taiwan Scholarship Program.

Applicants can apply in all disciplines taught in Taiwan after one year of studying Mandarin.

For the Bachelor, the scholarship is granted for 5 years: one year of learning Mandarin + 4 years of university studies.

For the Masters, the scholarship is granted for 3 years: one year of learning Mandarin + 2 years of academic studies.

Applicants wishing to continue their higher education in Taiwan are invited to submit their application before March 9, 2020 to the Embassy of Taiwan (Republic of China) located at # 22, Rue Lucien Hubert, Morne Calvaire, Pétion-ville, in an envelope indicating – Application for a “MOFA Taiwan Scholarship Program” grant

Qualifications Required :

Bachelor studies (licence) :

  • Be under the age of 23
  • Have a good knowledge of English
  • Hold a high school diploma
  • Having obtained at least the following grades in BAC II: Philo A: 770/1100; Philo C: 1190/1700. ; Philo D: 1120/1600.
  • Or have obtained at least 7/10 average at the BAC Unique.

Masters studies :

  • Be less than 30 years old
  • A good knowledge of English
  • Holds an undergraduate university degree

Documents required for the submission of applications :

  • A copy of the completed registration form signed by the applicant. Download the registration form (English) : https://www.haitilibre.com/docs/Taiwan-MOFA-Scholarship-Application-Form.odt
  • An autobiography (in English of 500 words)
  • A copy of the national identification card
  • A copy of the end of studies diploma (secondary diploma for the License; university diploma for the master’s) authenticated with the competent authority of the Haitian government with a certified English translation.
  • A copy of transcript of marks (BAC II or Single BAC for the License; university notes for the master’s) authenticated with the competent authority of the Haitian government with a certified English translation

Selection Procedures :

  • Applicants must submit their application before March 9, 2020 to the Embassy of the Republic of China (Taiwan), located at # 22, Rue Lucien Hubert, Morne Calvaire, Pétion-Ville, in an envelope indicating Application for scholarship “MOFA Taiwan Scholarship Program”.
  • Applicants shortlisted will be notified by email or telephone before March 24, 2020 to participate in a written and oral exam at the Embassy.
  • The candidates selected for the final selection will be informed at the beginning of July 2020 according to the conditions and regulations Download the regulations (English) : https://www.haitilibre.com/docs/MOFA-Taiwan- Scholarship-guidelines.pdf

Other information visit the Embassy website: www.taiwanembassy.org/ht_fr/post/2010.html

HL/ HaitiLibre

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Haiti – FLASH : Mexico will help Haiti to electrify

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Haiti – FLASH : Mexico will help Haiti to electrify
21/01/2020 10:34:35

Haiti - FLASH : Mexico will help Haiti to electrify

Luc Garvey Jean Pierre, Chargé d’affaires of the Embassy of Haiti in Mexico, announced that there is now a broad interest on the part of Mexico to help Haiti in particular in the development of the energy sector and more generally in the immigration sector, by exporting to Haiti one of Mexico’s star programs “Sembrando Vida” (sowing life).

The Haitian diplomat said that several steps had already been taken with the Minister of Foreign Affairs Marcelo Ebrard and with the Mexican authorities to promote several actions that will allow Haiti to develop above all its energy sector. To do this, a group of Mexican experts will travel to Haiti in the coming days to establish a line of work and advance a project to promote solar panels. In addition, a line of credit will be opened to allow Haiti to modernize its energy sector.

In addition, 25 grants will be awarded in the public policy sector, to tackle social issues in the coming years.

The Chargé d’affaires said that the “Sembrando Vida” program will be exported to Haiti. This flagship program in Mexico seeks to mitigate migration from mainly Central America, but which also has a significant component of Haitians. Luc Garvey Jean Pierre, hopes that with this program and the tightening of Donald Trump’s immigration policies, the Haitian flows that seek to cross Mexico to reach the United States could be significantly reduced.

HL/ HaitiLibre

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iciHaiti – Jacmel : Launch of the 2020 carnival season

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iciHaiti – Jacmel : Launch of the 2020 carnival season
21/01/2020 09:49:24

iciHaiti - Jacmel : Launch of the 2020 carnival season

Sunday, January 19, in the presence in particular of the Prime Minister and Minister of Culture Jean-Michel Lapin, the Departmental Delegate Pierre-Michel Lafontant, notables and craftsmen, the Town Hall of Jacmel kicked off the carnival season 2020.

This launch comes 3 days after the meeting of the carnival office with the local press to exchange ideas and make a better realization of this cultural event this year. During this meeting, Marky Kessa, the Mayor of Jacmel presented the main lines of the 2020 edition which will unfold around the theme “Imaj Jakmèl se imaj pa m’” (Jacmel’s image is mine).

The special weekend where Jacmel’s Carnival will take place will also be that of Valentine’s Day (Friday 14 to Sunday 16 February 2020).

IH/ iciHaiti

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Haiti – Politic : Commissioning of modern sanitary blocks in 3 schools

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Haiti – Politic : Commissioning of modern sanitary blocks in 3 schools
21/01/2020 09:36:17

Haiti - Politic : Commissioning of modern sanitary blocks in 3 schools

Commissioning ceremonies of modern sanitary blocks for the benefit of students were held at the École Foyer Chrétien in Sarasin, Lycée Jean-Jacques Dessalines and Lycée Marie Jeanne.

The realization of these health infrastructures is part of a project to build 66 modern sanitary blocks in schools, markets and public places throughout the national territory, within the framework of the policy of modernization advocated by President Moïse.

These sanitary blocks are divided into two (girls and boys). The access is arranged to allow people with reduced mobility to easily meet their needs and a space is provided for hand washing.

The water supply is carried out as appropriate, either through the network of the National Directorate of Drinking Water and Sanitation (DINEPA) or through a borehole (well).

In order to ensure the proper management of these sanitary blocks, a memorandum of understanding has been signed between DINEPA and the Directors of educational establishments.

HL/ HaitiLibre

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iciHaiti – Australian Open : Good start for Naomi Osaka

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iciHaiti – Australian Open : Good start for Naomi Osaka
21/01/2020 09:30:10

iciHaiti - Australian Open : Good start for Naomi Osaka

Sunday for his entry into the Australian Open, the Haitian-Japanese Naomi Osaka (22), defending champion (4th in the world), against the Czech Marie Bouzková (21) (59th) won the victory in two sets [6-2, 6-4].

“I had never played against her and for me it’s always difficult to play against someone you don’t know in the first round of a Grand Slam […]” said Naomi who easily won the first set but who had to raise his level of play in the second set, committing numerous direct faults (28 in total against 13 for Bouzkova) before winning in 1:20 [6-4].

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French and Haitian cultures collide in Zombi Child | Movie Review

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French writer-director Bertrand Bonello is one of the best and most underrated filmmakers working today. Each feature since his 2011 film House of Tolerance, about a Parisian brothel in the early 1900s, exemplifies his uncommon ingenuity, from the revisionist biopic Saint Laurent (2014), based on the luxury French fashion designer’s life, to the audacious and evocative Nocturama (2016), in which a group of French twentysomethings execute a series of terrorist attacks around Paris. His eighth feature, Zombi Child, feels smaller in scope compared to the three that precede it, and Bonello seems to recognize this. In an interview with Film Comment, he said he’d wanted to make a big feature, but since it wasn’t easy to finance, he decided to make a small film instead. Still, it’s accomplished and captivating. As in his best efforts, he exhibits a fervor and commitment toward his influences—in this case, a long-time fascination with Haiti and media about zombies and voodoo—that, combined with his singular approach, make for something exceptional.

The film opens in Haiti in 1962. A man (Mackenson Bijou) falls down dead in the street, gets resurrected as a zombie, and is forced to work on a sugar plantation with others of his kind. Bonello then cuts to a prestigious all-girls boarding school in present-day Paris, where a group of young girls, led by Fanny (Louise Labeque), welcomes Mélissa (Wislanda Louimat) into their literary society. Mélissa, who comes from Haiti and whose parents died in the 2010 earthquake, gains entry into their group by reciting Rene Depestre’s poem Cap’tain Zombi. She later tells the girls that her aunt Katy, with whom she lives outside the school, is a voodoo priestess, also known as a mambo. Bonello continues intertwining the narratives of the zombified man in 1960s Haiti and the girls in contemporary France. In languorous interludes, we see the former liberate himself from the sugar plantation, then visit his own grave and observe his wife from afar. At the school Fanny, Mélissa, and the rest of their group attend classes, listen to music, and hold secret, candle-lit meetings. In voice-over Fanny composes love letters to her boyfriend, Pablo, who’s seen only in elusive, dreamlike sequences, and Mélissa begins doing odd things, such as making monster-like noises at night and telling Fanny she’s going to eat her.

Bonello brings a distinct visual style to each film, and Zombi Child evidences not just one, but two of them. Working with cinematographer Yves Cape (who also shot Leos Carax’s Holy Motors), Bonello shoots the Haiti sequences, often day-for-night, with an eye for the country’s natural and spiritual wonders; he brings both an appreciation for French classicism and a critical view of its institutions to the boarding school sequences. The separate looks of the film mirror Bonello’s dual focus on past and present, which begins to blur as he merges the narratives in the last third of the film. After Pablo breaks up with her, Fanny goes to see Mélissa’s aunt, wanting first to forget Pablo but then to have his spirit enter her body. Back at the school, Mélissa tells the other girls about her grandfather, Clairvius Narcisse, the man in the other timeline, who also existed in real life. As Katy and Fanny’s sequence descends into the film’s only incident of true horror, the former having summoned the frightful loa (Voodoo god) Baron Samedi, Mélissa reveals that, eventually, Clairvius went back to his wife and had two daughters, her mother and aunt. Occuring at the same time in present-day Haiti is a ceremony honoring Clairvius on the anniversary of his second death.

Bonello’s films often aestheticize politics, and this is no less the case with Zombi Child. He acknowledges the inherently appropriative nature of a white European director telling a story (at least in part) about a culture other than his own. In the aforementioned Film Comment interview, he said, “I had to find the right point of view for the story, because, of course, I’m not black—I’m French. So the film could not be set only in Haiti. You can’t come in and say, ‘Okay, I’m going to make a film about voodoo and zombies.’ So I had to find a French point of view for the film.”

Many of the parts set in contemporary France interrogate problematic elements of French identity; in one scene at the boarding school, a professor scrutinizes the exalted reputation of the French Revolution and the concept of a frustrated liberty that was never truly enacted. Bonello’s appropriation of Haitian culture could be described as political in reverse; as opposed to George Romero’s Dawn of the Dead or, more recently, Jim Jarmusch’s The Dead Don’t Die, zombism isn’t a political metaphor here. Rather, Bonello seems intent on exploring zombiism and other aspects of voodoo culture earnestly, with reverence for its origins.

This is likely due to Bonello’s deference to his cultural and artistic influences. The director previously worked with cinematheques to curate a series in conjunction with Nocturama, and now, concurrent with the theatrical release of Zombi Child, Quad Cinema in Manhattan is presenting a series of films, chosen by Bonello, that influenced his most recent work: Jacques Tourneur’s I Walked With a Zombie; Wes Craven’s The Serpent and the Rainbow (which is loosely based on a book about Clairvius Narcisse); Maya Deren, Cherel Ito, and Teiji Ito’s Divine Horsemen: The Living Gods of Haiti; and Jean Rouch’s The Mad Masters, among others. Bonello’s veneration toward his influences, which also include various books on the subject of Haitian culture, recalls the ardor of Swiss master Jean-Luc Godard, whose passion for art and literature inflects each of his films. Bonello’s reverence toward art and history along with his ability to filter both through his own frame of reference accounts for the filmmaker’s mastery, and Zombi Child continues his ongoing demonstration of it.   v

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