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Haiti – Justice : Opening of the judicial year without ceremony amid protests

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Haiti – Justice : Opening of the judicial year without ceremony amid protests
08/10/2019 09:47:07

Haiti - Justice : Opening of the judicial year without ceremony amid protests

Monday, amid protests the traditional opening ceremony of the judicial year that should take place at the Court of Cassation (Champs de Mars) in the presence of President Jovenel Moïse, was canceled, the opposition had given an appointment to activists and sympathizers front the Court of Cassation, in order to disrupt the ceremony the opening of the courts.

The absence of ceremony [traditional but optional] did not prevent the opening of the judicial year at the Court of Cassation, in the 5 Courts of Appeal, the 18 Courts of First Instance and the 183 Courts of Peace, as well as the special courts of the country which should resume normal processing of files of litigants

René Sylvestre, President of the Court of Cassation and President of the Superior Council of the Judiciary (CSPJ), sent a memorandum to presidents, deans and holders of courts and tribunals, informing them of the resumption of activities in the courts of the 18 jurisdictions of the country “Acting in his legal and constitutional attributions of Chief of the Judiciary, he solemnly declares, on Monday, the resumption of activities in all Courts and Tribunals of the national territory in accordance with the vow of art 75 of the decree of the 22 August 1995 relating to the judicial organization devoting in its first paragraph the first Monday of October” stipulates this memorandum.

Reacting to the cancellation of this ceremony, Me Wando Sainvilier, Dean of the Court of First Instance of Jacmel and President of the Professional Association of Magistrates said “The deleterious climate of the country does not allow to ask judges, lawyers and others Justice professionals to risk their lives for holding such a ceremony.”

For the 4th week of many determined protesters from Cité Soleil and other neighborhoods, took the concrete to claim for the umpteenth time the resignation of President Moïse. Most of the commercial activities were slowed down in the capital and in several provincial cities, public institutions had kept closed door as well as schools…

Barricades of burning tires were erected on several arteries of the capital, on the Delmas road and in other municipalities in the metropolitan area. Public transport was scarce.

Sporadic automatic gunfire was heard in the vicinity of the Champ de Mars. Media in the capital reported acts of vandalism and several clashes with wounded.

Determined to go to Petion-ville, protesters clashed at Delmas 48, police officers and agents of the Intervention and Maintenance Corps (CIMO) dispersed the crowd with tear gas and warning shots to prevent them from going to Pétion ville.

Protesters from Cité Soleil who were trying to ransom residents of Delmas 65, met with strong resistance from the victims, several injuries were reported including at least one shot, arrests were made near the Canadian Embassy.

S/ TB/ HaitiLibre

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More Than Remittances: A Millennial Expat Calls His Peers To Do Biz In Haiti

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We first met Christherson Jeanty last week in our report on Haiti’s grave political and economic crises. Jeanty was born in Haiti, grew up in Pompano Beach — and now lives in Haiti, where he owns a job placement and outsourcing firm. He also hosts an internet talk show, “Haitian Biz News,” on his YouTube channel SeeJeanty.

But we wanted to know more about why Jeanty stays in Haiti at a time when chaos is overshadowing commerce — and why he thinks other Haitian expats shouldn’t back away from Haiti now, but engage it. Jeanty spoke with WLRN’s Tim Padgett from Port-au-Prince.

Excerpts from their conversation:

WLRN: Chris, you were born in Haiti in 1986 at the fall of the Duvalier dictatorship — when all this democratic promise lay in front of Haiti. But three years later your family immigrated to South Florida. Why?

JEANTY: The situation was very difficult for so many people in the country at the time, including my own folks. My dad was a traveling minister and was able to secure a visa to America. They did not see where democracy was going to take them in Haiti — and unfortunately Haitian democracy so far still has not changed their mind. My mom, though she is still very proud to be Haitian, I’ve told her, “Hey I’ll buy you a plane ticket to come over here [to visit],” and she’s declined the offer.

READ MORE: Moïse Mess: Haiti’s Political Standoff – and Humanitarian Crisis – Won’t Likely End Soon

When you were growing up in Broward County did you visit Haiti often?

Yes. My dad on the other hand, he’s still very much gung ho about Haiti, and I would visit my father’s native town up in the [southwestern] hills called Paillant. It was a very majestic, beautiful place where literally, you know, you can reach out your hand in any direction and there’s a fruit tree and you can just take it and eat it. I even rode around on a little mule. I was just completely enchanted and I was like, man, this — I want this.

And as you got older, what did you find drew you back to the country?

Being Haitian always was a big part of my identity. I spoke Creole very often. And for a lot of Haitians that’s really as far as it goes. But to me I felt it was necessary to really be part of the change that was needed in the country — because when I went there I saw the potential, I saw the people. But I just saw massive lack of investment. And I knew that on my deathbed I wanted to know that I provided X-amount of jobs to Haitians in Haiti.

Last year the Haitian diaspora sent $3 billion in remittances into the Haitian economy. But the problem is the vast majority of that money is going to day-to-day consumption, right? It’s not something that’s going to help drive the economy forward. OK: how do I build something that can employ and drive growth?

So you got a master’s in economics from Florida State University. You obviously had a bright business future ahead of you here in the U.S. if you wanted it. But three years ago at age 30 you chose to return to Haiti to start a business there — and you did so when the country’s political and economic situation was starting to collapse again. Why take that risk?

I was pushing 30, and I just finished paying off my student loan debt. So I quit my job working in data analytics — and I decide I’m moving to Haiti. I was having interviews with different business people in Haiti, and everyone told me they had difficulty finding good employees. And I said, ‘We’re in a country of over 70 percent unemployment and you’re having difficulty finding people? Let’s see what I can do about that’ — because I know technology, social media, you know, I know LinkedIn is a thing. There needs to be a solution. So I opened up a staffing firm, Haiti Pro Staffing.

SLAM DUNK

And soon I was made aware of a company coming in to Haiti to start a call center. They reached out and said they wanted me to help them find competent good staff. And I ran into a fellow, we’ll call him Jimmy — incredibly talented, very typical of so many Haitians here. He could speak English, Spanish, French — but again, jobless, right? And I recommended him to the call center. And it was a slam dunk. That company’s come back to me and said, hey, can I find them 10 more just like him?

But how do you sell Haitian expats of your generation on that idea of coming back to Haiti?

That’s a big part of why I created my YouTube channel. I have one video entitled the top three things when dealing with political instability: how you overcome it. I don’t sugarcoat anything.

Copyright 2019 WLRN 91.3 FM. To see more, visit WLRN 91.3 FM.

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IOM launches $10m funding appeal for Hurricane Dorian relief – EyeWitness News

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Appeal underscores “widespread” fear among people of Haitian descent

NASSAU, BAHAMAS- The International Organization for Migration has launched a $10 million funding appeal for Hurricane Dorian relief operations in The Bahamas.

The appeal has allocated $2.5 million for camp coordination and management, $2.4 million for shelter support and non-food items and $1 million for early recovery efforts, with the remaining funding to go to information management, protection, and public works like large-scale debris removal.

It claims vulnerable Haitian migrants, as well as documented migrants and Bahamians of Haitian descent, fear arrest and deportation after losing documents in the storm.

The appeal furthered those migrants were living in “very precarious conditions” even before the deadly Category 5 hurricane splintered shantytown communities.

The IOM’s camp coordination and management covers efforts to assist government plans to establish a site for 2,000 people in Spring City, Abaco.

IOM’s shelter allocation will assist families – who can return to their homes with small-scale repairs through the provision of cash and/or labor, technical advice and tool-kits.

It underscored the government’s Prohibition to Build Order in shantytown communities has left populations without land to rebuild; and outlined plans to conduct a rapid assessment of Bahamian land and property.

The IOM’s funding requirement covers operations from September 2019 until April 2020. The agency is reportedly working to establish an office in Nassau (New Providence), Marsh Harbour (Abaco), and Freeport
(Grand Bahamas).

Early recovery efforts include plans to coordinate temporary employment or voluntary work of displaced populations affected by Hurricane Dorian. It cited “immediate needs to increase household income and enhance coping capacity and resilience, while strengthening social cohesion”.

The report added host communities in areas of displacement would be considered where possible, adding the lack of access to basic services and limited opportunities “may lead to tensions between displaced and
host communities”.

“On Abaco Island,” the appeal read, “following the Hurricane, Haitian communities have been decimated, with thousands of men, women, and children displaced. Some Haitians have gone to official shelters on New
Providence and other islands while others have not left the island.

“While many Haitian migrants have regular status, others are undocumented and fear arrest and deportation, and have therefore avoided contact with rescuers. Fear is however widespread, even among documented migrants and Bahamian nationals of Haitian descent, some of whom have lost their documents in the hurricane.”

The appeal highlighted the IOM’s Caribbean Needs Assessment on Migration Governance in 2018, which stated 25 % of the national population of the Bahamas are Haitian nationals – including both regular and irregular
migrants.

It noted training for humanitarian actors on victim identification, assistance and referral; sensitization for front-line officers and service providers, was a primary need identified by The Bahamas government during the IOM’s 2018 needs assessment.  “The situation on Grand Bahama and Abaco islands has deteriorated rapidly. Affected sites, particularly in central Abaco, are destroyed and remain uninhabitable,” the appeal read.

The IOM is an inter-governmental organization linked to the United Nations but it does not receive core funding.

It works closely with governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental partners to promote humane and orderly migration management.

The Bahamas is one of 173 member states.

As part of early recovery, the IOM will also “conduct market assessment, including rapid labor market assessment and where appropriate supply chain analysis, to identify sources of income for displaced people.”

The organization will also provide market-based programming, such as asset replacement grants, training for employment and job placement programmes, and for using appropriate modalities such as conditional cash transfer.

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Haiti – FLASH : Earthquake in Cap Haitien

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Haiti – FLASH : Earthquake in Cap Haitien
15/10/2019 05:21:35

Haiti - FLASH : Earthquake in Cap Haitien

On Monday, at 9:26 am, an earthquake with an intensity of 3.5 on the Richter scale occurred in Cap Haitien, the second largest city in the country.

The epicenter of the earthquake was located at 19.736 latitude, and -71.895 longitude, at a depth of 34 kilometers, 14km at sea northeast of Caracol, and 33km east of Cap-Haitien and 145km at Northeast of Port-au-Prince.

So far, no significant damage has been reported. However, the Department of Civil Protection (DPC) has not yet submitted its balance sheet.

Let’s recall that on September 25, an earthquake of 4.6 on the Richter scale was felt in the southern municipalities of Port Salut and Les Cayes https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-28846-haiti-flash-earthquake-in-the-south-of-les-cayes.html , while on July 30, a magnitude 3.3 earthquake was recorded 2 kilometers from Bainet https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-28372-haiti-flash-second-earthquake-in-haiti.html located in the province of the southeast, also without reported damage and a dozen times in the night from August 13 to 14 https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-28498-haiti-flash-at-least-10-earthquake-in-less-than-24-hours.html

Haiti is in the midst of a vast system of geological faults resulting from the movement of the tectonic plates of the Caribbean and North America, this is why Haiti is subject to frequent earthquakes.

See also :
https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-28846-haiti-flash-earthquake-in-the-south-of-les-cayes.html
https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-28498-haiti-flash-at-least-10-earthquake-in-less-than-24-hours.html
https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-28372-haiti-flash-second-earthquake-in-haiti.html

SL/ HaitiLibre

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