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Canada’s municipal nominee programme for permanent residence

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Canada’s municipal nominee programme for permanent residence

Jamaica To Canada

Wednesday, October 09, 2019

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Dear Mr Brown,

I recently heard about a new programme targeting cities to sponsor new immigrants to Canada. I would like to know more about this in order to weigh my options.

— OK

 

Dear OK:

There have been many cities or municipalities in Canada that have been addressing labour market shortages by sourcing workers from abroad.

Motivating immigrants to settle in Canada’s smaller towns and cities is a challenge dating back many years. These smaller communities struggle with the impact of a shrinking labour market and high emigration rates.

The Liberal Party of Canada has made a pledge to assist rural municipalities access more immigrants through a new programme that would be referred to as the “municipal nominee program”.

 

Municipal Nominee Program

The programme will empower local communities across Canada to directly sponsor new immigrants for Canadian permanent residence.

This programme would be for workers who:

• have the skills, education and work experience to contribute to the economy of a specific municipality;

• want to live in that province; and

• want to become permanent residents of Canada.

Each municipality would have its own requirements and streams to target certain groups, and requirements. For example, in a programme stream, municipalities may target:

• students;

• business people;

• skilled workers; and/or

• semi-skilled workers.

The programme will allow “local communities, chambers of commerce and local labour councils” to “directly sponsor new immigrants”, which seems to imply that the programme will be based on employer sponsorship.

The Liberal Party has represented that the arrangement would create a minimum of 5,000 spaces for the programme, which is not a significant number, as Canada seeks more than 330,000 immigrants in 2019. As such, although it may become a viable option if it becomes an official immigration programme, you should definitely be open to the existing federal and provincial nominee options.

 

Please visit jamaica2canada.com for additional information on Canadian permanent residence programmes, including Express Entry, The Study & Work programme, visas or appeals, etc.

Antonn Brown, BA, (Hons), LLB, MSc, RCIC, is an immigration counsel and an accredited Canadian education agent of JAMAICA2CANADA.COM — a Canadian immigration and education firm in Kingston. Send questions/comments to jamaica2canada@gmail.com.

 

 

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Poor diets damaging children’s health worldwide, warns UNICEF

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NEW YORK, United States — An alarmingly high number of children are suffering the consequences of poor diets and a food system that is failing them, UNICEF warned in a new report on children, food and nutrition, to be released today.

The State of the World’s Children 2019: Children, food and nutrition finds that at least 1 in 3 children under five – or over 200 million – is either undernourished or overweight. Almost two in three children between six months and two years of age are not fed food that supports their rapidly growing bodies and brains. This puts them at risk of poor brain development, weak learning, low immunity, increased infections and, in many cases, death.

“Despite all the technological, cultural and social advances of the last few decades, we have lost sight of this most basic fact: If children eat poorly, they live poorly,” said Henrietta Fore, UNICEF executive director.

“Millions of children subsist on an unhealthy diet because they simply do not have a better choice. The way we understand and respond to malnutrition needs to change: It is not just about getting children enough to eat; it is above all about getting them the right food to eat. That is our common challenge today,” she continued.

The report provides the most comprehensive assessment yet of 21st century child malnutrition in all its forms. It describes a triple burden of malnutrition: undernutrition, hidden hunger caused by a lack of essential nutrients, and overweight among children under the age of five, noting that around the world:

• 149 million children are stunted, or too short for their age;

• 50 million children are wasted, or too thin for their height;

• 340 million children – or one in two – suffer from deficiencies in essential vitamins and nutrients such as vitamin A and iron;

• 40 million children are overweight or obese.

The report warns that poor eating and feeding practices start from the earliest days of a child’s life. Though breastfeeding can save lives, for example, only 42 per cent of children under six months of age are exclusively breastfed, and an increasing number of children are fed infant formula. Sales of milk-based formula grew by 72 per cent between 2008 and 2013 in upper middle-income countries such as Brazil, China and Turkey, largely due to inappropriate marketing and weak policies and programmes to protect, promote and support breastfeeding.

As children begin transitioning to soft or solid foods around the six-month mark, too many are introduced to the wrong kind of diet, according to the report. Worldwide, close to 45 per cent of children between six months and two years of age are not fed any fruits or vegetables. Nearly 60 per cent do not eat any eggs, dairy, fish or meat.

As children grow older, their exposure to unhealthy food becomes alarming, driven largely by inappropriate marketing and advertising, the abundance of ultra-processed foods in cities but also in remote areas, and increasing access to fast food and highly sweetened beverages.

For example, the report shows that 42 per cent of school-going adolescents in low-and middle-income countries consume carbonated, sugary, soft drinks at least once a day and 46 per cent eat fast food at least once a week. Those rates go up to 62 per cent and 49 per cent, respectively, for adolescents in high-income countries.

As a result, overweight and obesity levels in childhood and adolescence are increasing worldwide. From 2000 to 2016, the proportion of overweight children between 5 and 19 years of age doubled from 1 in 10 to almost 1 in 5. Ten times more girls and 12 times more boys in this age group suffer from obesity today than in 1975.

The greatest burden of malnutrition in all its forms is shouldered by children and adolescents from the poorest and most marginalised communities, the report notes. Only 1 in 5 children aged six months to two years from the poorest households eats a sufficiently diverse diet for healthy growth. Even in high-income countries such as the UK, the prevalence of overweight is more than twice as high in the poorest areas as in the richest areas.

The report also noted that climate-related disasters cause severe food crises. Drought, for example, is responsible for 80 per cent of damage and losses in agriculture, dramatically altering what food is available to children and families, as well as the quality and price of that food.

To address this growing malnutrition crisis in all its forms, UNICEF is issuing an urgent appeal to governments, the private sector, donors, parents, families and businesses to help children grow healthy by:

• empowering families, children and young people to demand nutritious food, including by improving nutrition education and using proven legislation – such as sugar taxes – to reduce demand for unhealthy foods;

• driving food suppliers to do the right thing for children, by incentivising the provision of healthy, convenient and affordable foods;

• building healthy food environments for children and adolescents by using proven approaches, such as accurate and easy-to-understand labelling and stronger controls on the marketing of unhealthy foods;

• mobilising supportive systems – health, water and sanitation, education and social protection – to scale up nutrition results for all children;

• collecting, analysing and using good-quality data and evidence to guide action and track progress.

“We are losing ground in the fight for healthy diets,” said Fore. “This is not a battle we can win on our own. We need governments, the private sector and civil society to prioritise child nutrition and work together to address the causes of unhealthy eating in all its forms.”

 

 

 

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A tree for life

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A tree for life

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

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Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister Audley Shaw (left), and student of Christiana High School in Manchester, Vanessa Plummer, plant a lychee tree
during this year’s World Food Day National Exhibition, at the institution last Friday. The event was staged by the ministry, in collaboration with the United Nations Food
and Agriculture Organization (FAO), to mark the day being officially observed on October 16 under the theme ‘Our Actions are Our Future: Healthy Diets for a #ZeroHunger
World’. This year’s celebrations are aimed at heightening public awareness about the importance of healthy diets. Other participants include (from second left): FAO
representative for Jamaica, Belize and The Bahamas Dr Crispim Moreira; Custos for Manchester Garfield Green; Permanent Secretary in the ministry, Dermon Spence; Rural
Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) chief executive officer, Peter Thompson; and a representative of RADA. (Photo: JIS)


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‘The next time they will kill somebody’

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THE family of a man seen in a video being beaten by members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) is demanding “justice”, arguing that the Sunday morning incident has left them shaken.

The man, 24-year-old Romaine Abrahams, was seen in the video, which has since gone viral on social media, descending a flight of stairs. He was being followed closely by the police officers, who appeared to engage him in a heated spat.

Once the parties reached the ground floor of the high-rise building in Denham Town, west Kingston, Abrahams and the lawmen walked a short distance before a tussle ensued between him and one of the cops.

Abrahams was then thrown to the ground by the lawman, who is then joined by his colleague. The two rained blows on the young man, before one stomps on his head.

The incident drew the ire of neighbours who screamed at the lawmen in hopes of getting them to stop.

The onslaught was interrupted only when another lawman pulled his colleague away from Abrahams.

At this point, that cop raised his gun towards the crowd, from which Abrahams’ Metropolitan Parks & Market (MPM) colleague steps forward to speak with the officer. The injured man’s brother also intervenes, while voicing his displeasure at how his older brother was being treated.

Yesterday, the Police High Command, in a statement, said that it has instructed its Inspectorate and Professional Oversight Bureau to conduct an investigation into the circumstances surrounding “an altercation, caught on camera, between police officers and citizens in Kingston West”.

However, in an interview with the Jamaica Observer yesterday, Abrahams and his family said they were not satisfied with the police’s response.

According to the group, the video, recorded by residents, should be enough to relieve the cops of their duties.

“They are a menace to society,” Abrahams’ sister Sherian Abrahams-Williams said.

“This is not the first time men who call themselves police come in this same ghetto and senselessly beat people. The next time they will kill somebody. We want justice and we will not stop until them lose them work and deh lock-up,” she continued.

Williams-Abrahams told the Observer that lawmen “stormed” the building shortly after 6:00 am, allegedly with guns in hand, knocking on doors, all while shouting, “Police!”

She said her mother was asked by her brother who was at the door.

At that point, she said her mother opened the door to a “barrage” of questions from the lawmen, reportedly including whether or not “any bwoy in deh?”

The woman said this was when her brother asked what the matter was, and why the cops were being so aggressive.

“Him seh, ‘Officer, mi nuh understand the problem, why unuh a behave suh fah?’. Them take him out and a walk him down the stairs and him tell Mommy fi go fi him ID (identification card). Anyway, them continue walk him down the stairs. When him reach the zone and them seh, ‘Go in the car’, one of them push him and start fight him and every one of them start fight him. Them a beat him, brutally, kick him inna him face. Them kick him inna him neck; them step pon him. Four of them do him bad. One of them end up take up a stone and lick him with the stone. That’s when his co-worker run out inna him MPM work clothes and mi other brother in the black shirt rush and a ask why them a do him suh,” Williams-Abrahams stated.

Her brother is alleged to have called one of the lawmen “b…. bwoy” in the lead-up to the incident.

“Him did almost unconscious. When him get up him nuh know what happen. Him did a stagger. Fi know seh them do him that cut wi up. It cut wi up bad. It traumatise wi. When you see neighbours come out suh and a defend him and we and them nuh talk, yuh must know,” she stressed.

Abrahams, the father of a four-year-old son, also spoke to the Observer yesterday from his doctor’s office: “All now mi a look pon the video and eye water inna mi eye. Every time mi watch it mi cry. A cry mi a cry, star. Mi not a idler; mi work, suh fi watch back and see them a do mi suh mek mi cry. Mi feel a way,” the man, who was connected to an IV drip during the interview, said.

“When them handcuff mi and put mi inna the vehicle, them still a beat mi. Mi mother a ask weh mi do why them a lick and a beat her son suh,” he added.

He said he was taken to Kingston Public Hospital, before being charged with resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer.

“Right now I am feeling dizzy and I’m in a lot of pain. Mi have pain inna mi neck, in my hands, and mi can’t even stand up so good. Mi feel weak-out bad. Mi never imagine this fi myself,” he told the Observer.

In the meantime, Abrahams-Williams said that she was grateful residents captured the incident on camera.

“We need justice for this. I am very happy people record it. Mi thankful fi them who was out there early videoing everything, from the start… I was very grateful to them. It grieve them too, and it hurt them. What everybody was saying is that if it was in the midnight hours they would kill him… Them never expect that people would come out videoing. So I’m thankful and mi really appreciate them for doing this for us,” she said.

“What wi want right now is fi [Prime Minister] Andrew Holness step in fi this, because a the second person this happen to. The next person them a mix-up them wi kill them. Wi have good people in the ghetto. Wi have bad, but wi have good too. Not everybody bad,” Abrahams-Williams said.

She said that the family will be contacting an attorney.

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