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Helping make a difference in Haiti | News

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In October, a team from the Arthur Evangelical Free Church, Meriden Evangelical Free Church by Cherokee, and surrounding area churches will be traveling to Haiti.

For Mag Sauser and Teresa Paulsrud, this will be their third trip to Haiti since October 2017. Twenty-one people will head to Haiti on this one-week October trip. The team will be volunteering at United Christians International (UCI) in Haiti.

Paulsrud’s son, Eli, and daughter-in-law, Molly, started going on mission trips to Haiti about seven to eight years ago and have made many trips. After hearing the couple’s experiences and seeing how strongly they felt about Haiti, Teresa and her husband, Bob, wanted to go themselves. Molly travels to Haiti two times a year. She is on the American UCI board.

United Christians International was founded by JeanJean Mompremier’s and his wife, Kristie, who is originally from Orange City. Kristie met JeanJean while on a mission trip to Haiti.

Teresa said that when the couple shares their story, they say, “We had nothing – no building, no Bible, no clothing for others. We had God, and that’s the only thing we had.”

UCI began in 2005 in an area near Caiman, Haiti, that had nothing. Today, there is a school, a university, nutrition center, church, and health clinic. The UCI campus is the center point of the team’s trip. From there, they go to different villages.

“You can see the process when you go back to the same place (each year),” Teresa said.

Before leaving for Haiti, the team discusses how to spend the funds and on what projects. The team holds a couple of fundraisers to help raise money from free-will donation meals at churches, auctions, and tip night at Pizza Ranch in Storm Lake and Denison.

Some money is sent ahead so supplies can be purchased. The team purchases lots of beans and rice to help feed the hungry.

On last year’s trip in 2018, the team was fortunate to have five registered nurses with them, including Teresa and Sauser’s niece, Jill Else, a nurse who works in labor and delivery in Storm Lake.

With their medical experiences, the team organized a clinic for 25 pregnant Haiti women. There isn’t lot of prenatal care/education in Haiti, according to Sauser.

“Most births in Haiti happen at home on a dirt floor and in the dark where there is no electricity,” Sauser said.

There were five different stations – vital checks: blood pressure/blood sugar; prenatal vitamins – beans and rice; ultrasound; nutrition/family planning; and the ladies received a “supply bag.”

“These women had never seen or heard of an ultrasound machine,” Sauser said. “They don’t have any idea when their babies are due.”

Another way the team tries to help improve Haitians’ living environment is by providing funds to pour cement floors for families. The cost to pour a cement floor in a house is $350. Houses in Haiti are very simple. Most don’t have electricity or furniture.

Kids can easily get tapeworms from sleeping on the dirt floor. Sauser said tapeworms consume 60% what kids eat, which is extremely hard on children who are already starving.

The cement is hauled in bucket-by-bucket since there are no cement trucks. The homeowners help the team with the project, leveling the ground, stringing off the area, and helping mix the cement.

“It is a great way to work together,” Teresa said.

UCI goes into different feeding centers in villages and choses 15 to 30 of the most malnourished children and feed them beans and rice a couple times a week.

Sauser said on one day of the trip, the team had been able to financially feed any children who want to come to the feeding center.

“The word spreads quickly about those things,” added Teresa.

The area is trying to develop more agriculture, which can be hard to grow with the very rocky soil.

Teresa said her husband likes to help with this cause because they are working on growing the number of pigs, chickens, and goats.

“We have donations from people around here (in Iowa) that say they want to buy a goat for a family,” Teresa said. It costs $50 to purchase a goat for a family in Haiti.

Other projects the team takes part in include visiting the local elementary school and helping students with their English class and going on prayer walks to the surrounding villages to visit with residents, giving them Bibles and beans and rice.

Interpreters help the team communicate with the Haiti residents are.

“We have about eight college-age interpreters who help with translating who are priceless,” Teresa said. “We couldn’t do it without them. You grow to love them.”

When volunteers/teams on mission trips come to the UCI, it creates an “economic boom” as it creates job for the translators, cooks, and housekeepers.

Haiti is the poorest county in the Western Hemisphere.

The volunteers/teams stay in a dormitory and have three meals a day. Most of the cooking is done on an open fire. There is some electricity, but Teresa said there are no guarantees. The water for the showers is warmed in tanks on the roof, so you have to be quick to shower.

“You learn to beat people to the shower, or it might be a little cold, or you might run out (of water).” Sauser said. The team learns to live pretty simple during their trip.

One of Sauser’s favorite stories about her time in Haiti is about a pastor she met. He had broken his leg as a child, and it had never healed correctly. Sauser got every measurement she could of his leg. She took the measurements to Sioux City Prosthetics and asked the cost of the shoes to help the pastor walk easier. They built the shoe and didn’t charge anything. With the shoes, the pastor, for the first time in his life, could stand right. While Molly was on a trip to Haiti this summer, she told Sauser she saw that pastor wearing his shoes.

Teresa and Sauser said one of the interesting experiences while in Haiti is going to the “Open Air Market.” The Open Air Market is held once a week and showcases the very best of the people of Haiti. Parking is full of donkeys or small scooters instead of cars. Teresa noted that the market has raw meat with flies flying around it; goat bread and donkeys stand inches from the food you are going to eat.

In the past, the team has taken supplies with them. This year they are flying to Haiti on a smaller plane and can’t take as many supplies. They are planning to buy things, such as school supplies and other supplies and items, at the market. Sauser added the market is another way to support their economy.

With this being their third trip to Haiti and visiting the same place, Sauser said you really get to know the people, and they remember you.

Teresa said one of the team members says, “You think you’re going down there to bless them, and it turns out we get so blessed.”

She added, “The simplicity of life is so different.”

This Saturday, Aug. 24, a fundraiser is being held at Prairie Pedlar Gardens near Odebolt. Social hour begins at 5 p.m. with dinner at 6 p.m. and a program at 7 p.m. The guest speakers for the evening are Kristie and JeanJean, the founders of UCI. Free-will donations are accepted as all proceeds to go towards UCI’s next goal of building a teaching hospital, which ties into one of the departments at UCI University – a medical school.

For more information about UCI, go online to www.ucihaiti.org.

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Haiti: Protest against fuel shortage turns violent in Port-au-Prince

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Hack:

  • Fuel crisis has led to the suspension of classes, public institutions and businesses which has amplified the economic woes
  • The suppliers are struggling to procure state-subsidized fuel for the domestic market as the government is highly indebted

Violence erupted in Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, on Friday after protestors demanded an end to the fuel crisis and started pelting stones and glass bottles at the police. The police, in retaliation, fired live rounds and tear gas at the protestors. Haiti is going through a severe economic crisis and heightened unemployment rate which currently stands at 70%. The fuel crisis has led to the suspension of classes, public institutions and businesses which has amplified the economic woes.

ReadIran Seizes Vessel In Persian Gulf For ‘smuggling Diesel Fuel’ To UAE

The Carribean country has been plagued by the fuel crisis since mid-August which led to several anti-government rallies. The suspension of Venezuela’s PetroCaribe scheme is one of the reasons for the fuel crisis. The corruption-plagued scheme allowed Haiti to procure petroleum products at cheaper rates and defer the payment for up to 25 years. The situation aggravated after the suppliers refused to deliver petroleum products leading to long queues at petrol pumps.

ReadFuel Demand Rises 2.8% YoY In August; Dips To Its Lowest In 9 Months

Government marred with corruption 

Amidst all this, President Jovenel Moïse, who himself has faced allegations of corruption, has been trying to install acting Prime Minister Fritz-William Michel as the official Prime Minister but his ratification has been delayed indefinitely. Protestors have been demanding the resignation of Moïse holding him responsible for the crisis. Moïse, during his election campaign in 2017, had promised “food on every plate and money in every pocket,” but the current GDP per capita and unemployment rate tell a different story altogether.

ReadWATCH: In Dramatic Action, Iran Seizes Ship With 1 Million Liters Of ‘smuggled’ Fuel

Unstable government and economic slowdown

The suppliers are struggling to procure state-subsidized fuel for the domestic market as the government is highly in debt. The Carribean nation with a GDP per capita income of $870 in 2018 could be hit by the price rise due to fuel shortage. The country is reeling with instability after the Chamber of Deputies passed a vote of no-confidence in Prime Minister Jean Henry Ceant, six months after he assumed office. It is also vulnerable to natural disasters like hurricanes and floods which affect its economy severely.

ReadHong Kong Protesters Take Over Mall, Fold Origami Cranes

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10 Years After Haiti’s Earthquake, ‘This Music School Will Never Stop’

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The other day, I went down to the National Mall here in Washington, D.C., and heard the sound of hope in sweet, strong, young voices.

A youth choir and chamber ensemble from Haiti are on a U.S. tour that’s taken them from Maine to Manhattan to Kentucky over the past month. This stop was in a lush garden of the Smithsonian museums. The tour is meant to showcase Haiti’s rich musical heritage — and to raise awareness of the country’s rebuilding efforts.

We’re coming up to the 10th anniversary of the disastrous earthquake that struck Haiti on January 12, 2010. It’s estimated that tens of thousands, possibly hundreds of thousands of people were killed.

The earthquake destroyed Holy Trinity Cathedral in the capital, Port-au-Prince, and the renowned music school where the youth choir and orchestra study. Many of the students are from poor backgrounds, and some of them are too young now to even remember the earthquake a decade ago.

I spoke with several of the youngest choir members in French. Jeff Donalson Philistin, a 10-year-old soprano in the choir, was just an infant when the earthquake hit. His mother has told him the story of what happened: “The house nearly collapsed on me,” he told me. “But my mother was brave, and came to save me.”

This choir has become a kind of salvation for the young singers, like 12-year-old Marie Danielle Tondreau, whose legs can’t keep still when she’s singing. “When I sing, I feel like I’m up in the sky,” she said.

Dawins Rolph Jean-Pierre, 12, chimed in: “The choir is like a family for me. When we sing together, it’s really great. We have fun, we dance, we sing with all our friends.”

For Reverend David Cesar, the director of Holy Trinity Music School, the spirit of these young singers captures the Haiti that he believes in.

“Imagine,” he said. “When we talk about Haiti, about bad things — about the political issues, economical issues — and see those kids bringing [pride] and hope to their country, sometime I got some tears.”

Two people from the music school — a staff member and a saxophone student — were killed in the earthquake. Along with their destroyed building, the school lost hundreds of instruments. The staff salvaged what they could from the rubble.

Just one week after the quake, Cesar gathered some students and said: Let’s go. Let’s go perform for the survivors, living in tent camps.

“To bring some joy, because it was a period of sadness and mourning,” Cesar explained. “And also to say to our brothers and sisters, ‘Stand up. Stand up!’ And we performed for them. So they were so happy to stand up and dance.”

I mentioned to Cesar that among all the things people in that dire circumstance would need — food, water, shelter — music would not automatically be on my list.

“Definitely, definitely,” he insisted. “And this is why I said, music and this music school and this orchestra will never stop. Whatever the situation.

“Haitian people, we’re born with music,” he continued. “So everything we are doing, we’re doing with music. We are sad, we sing. We are happy, we sing. We have music in our blood.”

For a while after the earthquake, Holy Trinity Music School had to hold classes and rehearse outside. Now, they have a temporary structure, but they hope to build a permanent home and concert hall. This tour is, in part, about raising funds to do that.

Ten years after the earthquake, the world’s attention to Haiti’s devastation has faded. I asked Cesar if he thinks we’ve forgotten about his country.

“I think we lost the momentum, but we keep fighting,” he said, and chuckled as he added, “As Bob Marley used to say, ‘Don’t give up the fight, don’t give up the fight!’ “

The tour of the youth choir and chamber ensemble from Haiti’s Holy Trinity Music School wraps up this week with concerts in Kentucky and Ohio.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in foreign language).

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The other day, I went down to the National Mall here in Washington, D.C., and heard the sound of hope in sweet, strong, young voices.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in foreign language).

BLOCK: A youth choir and chamber ensemble from Haiti are on a U.S. tour that’s taken them from Maine to Manhattan to Kentucky over the past month. This stop was in a lush garden of the Smithsonian museums. The tour is meant to showcase Haiti’s rich musical heritage and also to raise awareness of rebuilding efforts in Haiti. We’re coming up on the 10th anniversary of the disastrous earthquake that struck there in January 2010. It’s estimated that tens of thousands, possibly hundreds of thousands, of people were killed.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in foreign language).

BLOCK: The earthquake destroyed Holy Trinity Cathedral in the capital, Port-au-Prince, and the renowned music school there. That’s the school where these young people study, many of them from poor backgrounds, some of them too young now to even remember that earthquake a decade ago, like Jeff Donalson Philistin, a 10-year-old soprano. He was just an infant when the earthquake hit. His mother has told him the story of what happened.

JEFF DONALSON PHILISTIN: (Speaking French).

BLOCK: “The house nearly collapsed on me,” he says, “but my mother was brave and came to save me.”

This choir has become a kind of salvation for the young singers, like 12-year-old Marie Danielle Tondreau, whose legs can’t keep still when she’s singing.

MARIE DANIELLE TONDREAU: (Speaking French).

BLOCK: “When I sing,” she says, “I feel like I’m up in the sky.”

For Reverend David Cesar, the director of Holy Trinity Music School, the spirit of these young musicians captures the Haiti that he believes in.

DAVID CESAR: Imagine when we talk about Haiti, about bad things, about political issues, economical issues and see those kids bringing hope for their country. Sometime I got some tears.

BLOCK: Two people from the music school, a staff member and a saxophone student, were killed in the earthquake. Along with their destroyed building, the school lost hundreds of instruments. The staff salvaged what they could from the rubble. And one week after the quake, David Cesar gathered some students and said, let’s go. Let’s go perform for the survivors living in tent camps.

CESAR: To bring some joy. But it was a bit of sadness and mourning and also to say to our brothers and sisters, stand up. Stand up. And we performed for them. So they were so happy to stand up and dance.

BLOCK: I can think of so many things that people in that dire circumstance would need – food, water, shelter.

CESAR: Yes (laughter).

BLOCK: Music would not automatically be on my list.

CESAR: (Laughter) Definitely, definitely. And this is why I said music and this music school and this orchestra will never stop, whatever the situation.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in foreign language).

BLOCK: For a while after the earthquake, the music school had to hold classes and rehearse outside. Now they have a temporary structure, but they hope to build a permanent home and concert hall. This tour is, in part, about raising funds to do that.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in foreign language).

BLOCK: There was so much attention on Haiti at the time of the earthquake. Do you think we’ve forgotten about your country?

CESAR: I think we lost the momentum, but we keep fighting (laughter). As Bob Marley used to say, don’t give up the fight. Don’t give up the fight (laughter).

BLOCK: You should add some Bob Marley to the program.

(LAUGHTER)

BLOCK: The tour of the youth choir and chamber ensemble from Haiti’s Holy Trinity Music School wraps up this week with concerts in Kentucky and Ohio.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing in foreign language). Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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The New Humanitarian | In Nepal, a rushed earthquake rebuild leads to a mountain of debt

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Parang Tamang’s new home is slowly rising among the patchwork of half-finished buildings and piles of rubble in Gatlang, a mountain village in Nepal’s north. But so is his financial debt.

 

Parang’s home was flattened during the powerful earthquakes that struck Nepal in April and May 2015, killing 9,000 people across the country. More than three years later, government reconstruction subsidies haven’t been enough to cover the cost of rebuilding, so Parang turned instead to local lenders.

 

“The money I borrowed to rebuild my home is expensive,” Parang told IRIN. “The interest is 36 percent per year. The bank won’t pay me, so people in the village lent me the money.”

Parang isn’t alone. In July 2017, the government set a series of shifting deadlines to encourage people to access reconstruction subsidies. Over the last year, a rush to to meet these deadlines has triggered unintended side effects: people are taking on risky high-interest loans; some are building tiny, uninhabited homes they can’t afford to finish.

 

Advocates for earthquake-hit communities fear this large-scale borrowing could lead to a “debt crisis” that would cripple Nepal’s economic recovery.

 

A survey by aid organisations tracking reconstruction progress found a “drastic increase” in people resorting to loans to supplement government rebuilding funds since the start of 2017. Two thirds of respondents polled in December 2017 reported taking out loans to rebuild; 12 months earlier, it was only 1 percent.

“People weren’t rebuilding, so we had to do something,” said Manohar Ghimire, deputy spokesman for Nepal’s National Reconstruction Authority, which was set up shortly after the earthquake to manage the rebuild on a five-year timeline.

 

The latest deadline came and went in mid-July, though Ghimire says this is likely to be extended again.

Ghimire calls the deadline pressure a success, as construction rates have risen over the last year. Today, more than 800,000 households qualify for government subsidies, which are distributed in three separate payments totalling $3,000, depending on the stage of construction. More than 440,000 have received the second of these payments – a year ago, only 55,000 people had.

 

The problem with a quick build

 

Villages like Gatlang and surrounding Rasuwa District were among the hardest hit by the 2015 earthquakes – more than 70 percent of buildings here completely collapsed; more than 95 percent needed major repair or outright reconstruction, according to government statistics. But money alone hasn’t been enough to counter rising construction costs that exceed the government subsidy, confusion about the deadlines, or a lack of building skills.

 

Rijan Garjurel is the district coordinator in Rasuwa for the Housing Recovery and Reconstruction Platform – a coordination body that supports all government departments, NGOs, and donors working on reconstruction. He says the deadlines saw many people rush to collect the grant, even if they lacked the resources or skills to build safer, earthquake-resistant homes as the government intended.

Instead, they’re erecting fragile one-room structures beside their still-damaged homes – the reconstruction grants can only be used for new construction, rather than retrofitting old homes.

 

“They are just building for formality to receive the grant,” Garjurel said. “I often hear, ‘this is my government house, and this is our house.’”

 

He says the deadline has pushed people to forego using local building materials like stone, which is inexpensive but time-consuming to prepare. Instead, many here use imported brick and concrete blocks, which are quicker to build with but more expensive.

Recent surveys estimate that the typical cost of rebuilding is at least $6,500 – more than double the government subsidies.

 

“Transportation is expensive and so the money is not enough to get materials here,” said Dawa Gumbu Tamang, the elected head of Gatlang. “Many people start and then can’t carry on as they run out of money so houses are half built.”

 

Patience is a virtue

 

Reconstruction experts warn it is unrealistic to speed up such a large-scale reconstruction process in Nepal, where building costs are high and many lack the skills to rebuild entirely on their own.

 

“Deadlines are not going to speed these people up,” said Maggie Stephenson, a consultant who has advised NGOs and donors on recovery efforts. She added, “Who is in a bigger hurry than households themselves to rebuild their homes?”

 

Stephenson, who has also worked on earthquake reconstruction in Pakistan and Haiti, says recovery in other disasters has shown that a successful rebuild takes time.

 

After the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir, she says, it took at least five years to rebuild rural homes; urban homes there are still being constructed, 13 years later.

Stephenson says Nepal’s commitment to extending reconstruction grants to more than 800,000 homes is “remarkable”. But it also requires more support beyond funding, as well as a degree of patience – a situation that isn’t helped by frequent international media stories suggesting the rebuild pace has been “slow”.

 

“The point of an owner-driven housing programme with a grant as a subsidy means that you’re reliant on people mobilising their own resources as well,” Stephenson said, “and that’s going to take a much longer time.”

 

She says international donors and NGOs must do more to help rebuilding households overcome other roadblocks that have stalled construction, including boosting skills training so that more people know how to build and access the right materials. They also need to provide clearer information on the complex grant approval process, and do more to help typically marginalised groups like rural women and the elderly. Stephenson says this kind of essential technical support has only reached a quarter of the earthquake-affected communities who need it.

 

Chewang Gyalmo Ghale received training under such a programme. Practical Action, the UK-based development organisation, helped fund and train her to cut stones, which she sells to people rebuilding their homes in her village in Rasuwa District.

The money she earns is helping to finance her own rebuild. But she’s still living under a tarp – she says she hasn’t been approved for a government grant to finish her house, though she’s not sure why.

 

The grant money wouldn’t be enough to cover her rebuild anyway. It’s not enough for most of her neighbours, either.

 

“Many people here have had to take out loans to pay me to cut stones,” she said.

 

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