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Need to win makes leadership change necessary, say Bunting supporters

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Need to win makes leadership change necessary, say Bunting supporters

BY GARFIELD MYERS
Editor-at-large
South/Central Bureau

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

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MANDEVILLE, Manchester — For St Ann North Western Member of Parliament Dayton Campbell, a simple question goes to the heart of the matter.

“How could it be that we have the most corrupt government in the history of this country but by all indications and polls we (People’s National Party) can’t win…?” Campbell asked during the People’s National Party (PNP) Knockpatrick Divisional meeting at May Day High School on Sunday night.

The answer, said Campbell as he endorsed the decision of Manchester Central Member of Parliament Peter Bunting to challenge for leadership of the PNP, was that “something is not right, something is not right” within his party.

Without saying so in as many words, Campbell suggested that current party President Dr Peter Phillips had become unelectable and that the party, in its own interests, had to move on.

“It is the duty of every single PNP to ask themselves the question: What is the best choice for the PNP to win an election? And then we have to support the best choice for us to win an election,” he said.

He insisted that the move to unseat Phillips “is not about emotion…” but was aimed at allowing the party to fulfil its responsibility to take political power, eradicate widespread corruption, and defend the interests of Jamaicans most in need.

Campbell was among several speakers throwing their weight behind Bunting at the first public event for the PNP in the constituency, after the former Cabinet minister announced his intention to contest the PNP presidency.

Michael Stewart, Member of Parliament for Manchester Southern, declared that his constituency would not be “left behind”, assuring Bunting that “we are with you at this time…”

Like Campbell, Stewart observed that the PNP had failed to gain “traction” despite numerous corruption scandals afflicting the Andrew Holness-led Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) Government. “…Something is wrong in the top tier of the party and we need to take stock,” he said.

A medical doctor, Campbell said that on a daily basis he was hearing the cry for change in the PNP.

“Anybody in the PNP who a pretend like they don’t hear that, they are liars because every single one of us hear it every day,” said Campbell.

He dismissed criticism that Bunting’s challenge was selfish. He appeared to suggest that, if anything, that accusation would be more appropriately directed at the party president.

“This is not about selfish ambition. The selfish ambition would be to know that I can’t win but I still hold on like weh Eddie Seaga (the late Jamaican prime minister and JLP leader) do to the Labour Party. We do not want the People’s National Party to be Seagarised…,” he said to cheers.

The PNP, said Campbell, needed to rediscover “its soul” in order to successfully contest for State power and for government to defend the interests of the mass of the people.

He voiced the belief that Bunting would strive to “modernise” the party while strengthening internal democracy, allowing views to contend, and facilitating avenues for the ideas generated at group (party grass roots) level to reach the hierarchy.

Campbell poured scorn on those whom he said sought to portray Bunting’s wealth as a “disadvantage”. Instead, he said, Bunting’s success as an investment manager boded well should he some day take charge of the Jamaican Government.

Others voicing strong support for Bunting at the divisional meeting included mayor of Mandeville and councillor for the Royal Flat Division Donovan Mitchell, and former Mayor of Black River Everton Fisher (Balaclava Division).

Guest speaker at the conference, Dr Shane Alexis, caretaker for St Mary South Eastern, made it clear that he was there as a neutral in the expected leadership contest.

He reminded his audience that after the contest is over, Comrades must come together as “one” to defeat a “corrupt” JLP Government.

The contending forces should make sure that at all times there is due respect shown to others, he said.

The need for Comradely “love and respect” during the internal campaign was a recurring theme for speakers at the divisional conference, including Bunting who said he would “denounce” any supporter who betrayed that principle.

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Jamaica must benefit from solid waste divestment — McKenzie

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Jamaica must benefit from solid waste divestment — McKenzie

BY HORACE HINES
Staff reporter
editorial@jamaicaobserver.com

Sunday, September 15, 2019

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RETIREMENT, St James —Local Government Minister Desmond McKenzie says the reason for the long wait for the announced privitisation of the nation’s solid waste management operations is due to the Government’s insistence that the move will benefit the nation.

In 2016, Prime Minister Andrew Holness announced the appointment of an enterprise team to identify a preferred waste-management provider for the divestment of the Riverton landfill.

The nine-member team, chaired by Lyttleton Shirley, was charged with managing the process of establishing a waste-to-energy system in Jamaica and the contracting out of the solid waste collection and solid waste management of the country.

Holness said the move by the Government will see the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) moving towards a more regulatory role.

Last year, following fires at disposal sites across the country, the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ) joined the call for the fast-tracking of the divestment of the country’s solid waste management operations, but, McKenzie argued that “there is no quick fix to the problems that we face at our landfills”.

“Let’s say that divestment does not happen overnight just like that, it takes time. And as a Government we want to be clear that whatever decision we make on the divestment is one that will be of benefit to the people of Jamaica. So those who are saying why is it taking so long…we know it is taking long but we want to be very, very careful in what we are doing,” McKenzie explained.

He added: “We are looking to relocate at least two (landfills). It’s going to take a lot of money. The divestment team met with the chairman about two weeks ago, looking at how advanced the question of the divestment has taken place.”

He was speaking at the Retirement dump in St James, where he outlined a raft of initiatives put in place to reduce fires at the facility, some of which have been frequent in recent times. The latest outbreak in July left large swathes of Montego Bay blanketed by smoke over two days.

McKenzie announced that repairs were being carried out to some 1,500 metres of the roadway at the facility to guarantee easier access to the disposal site and to the active cells at the location, by way of:

• the creation of a designated cell to house tyres only,

• installation of pipes throughout the site to facilitate the transportation of water,

• installation of three fire hydrants at separate points across the landfill,

• installation of a 28,000 water tanks,

• the provision of a brand new dumper truck to be based at the facility to assist in the daily covering of the site,

• the placing of a response team on site to check the facility on a daily basis, and

• the provision of over 100 truckloads of top soil will be made available for covering.

“We not saying that what we are doing will answer all the concerns but at least it is going to put the organisation in a much better position to respond,” McKenzie noted.

He further stated: “For years this disposal site has been a bone of contention in St James and in the neighbouring parishes…the smoke nuisance and all the unnecessary things associated with fire. Some of them were set deliberately and some, based on the location, would happen naturally. The cry of the residents has been loud, the criticism of the Government hurts,” McKenzie outlined.

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Tooth to tooth contact

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Tooth to tooth contact

…It can lead to dental damage

by Dr Sharon Robinson

Sunday, September 15, 2019

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TEETH must put up with all sorts of things in the form of food every day.

Too much pressure on teeth can lead to dental damage in the form of dental abrasion or attrition. The teeth enamel may wear down and may make teeth weak.

What is dental attrition?

Dental attrition is a form of dental wear caused by tooth to tooth contact. The friction caused by teeth rubbing against each other can wear away the biting surfaces of the teeth.

Although attrition is often observed as a part of the ageing process, some people might experience more rapid and advanced attrition as a result of certain dental diseases and eating habits.

Bruxism, characterised as teeth grinding and clenching, is one of the biggest pathological reasons for attrition and can lead to severe dental wear and damage if not treated properly.

In serious cases, the protective layer of the teeth — the enamel — can be worn to the point that the inner dentin of the teeth is exposed, leading to tooth decay, causing increased dental sensitivity.

Symptoms of dental attrition

In addition to tooth decay and increased dental sensitivity, the symptoms and signs of dental attrition may also include:

• Sore or tender gums;

• Loss of teeth structure, including flattening or thinning of the teeth;

• An increase in dental pain due to the loss of the enamel layer;

• Damage or failure of prior dental treatments;

• Tooth discolouration as a result of the loss of enamel and exposure of the dentin layer.

Erosion is also a problem in people who suffer from gastrooesophageal reflux disease. In addition to this, the risk of erosion is high in individuals with a low salivary flow rate.

Prevention

• Reducing the intake of carbonated drinks and juices with very high levels of acidity is the key to preventing erosion of the teeth.

• Tooth brushing should be avoided immediately after consuming acidic drinks and meals for about 20 minutes. The acid present in these drinks softens the enamel of your teeth, making it susceptible to damage from brushing.

• The toothbrush should be held using a pen-grip. Vigorous, horizontal scrubbing actions and a hard toothbrush should be avoided.

• Teeth should not be used as tools to hold or grip items.

• Long-term use of tongue jewellery and mouth piercing should also be avoided.

• Different kinds of toothpaste carry different levels of abrasiveness. Whilst abrasives help to remove tooth stains, they may also contribute to tooth wear. People who are concerned about tooth wear should seek a less abrasive fluoride toothpaste. Fluoride in toothpaste also helps to combat tooth wear.

 

Dr Sharon Robinson DDS has offices at the Dental Place Cosmetix Spa, located at shop #5, Winchester Business Centre, 15 Hope Road, Kingston 10. Dr Robinson is an adjunct lecturer at the University of Technology, Jamaica, School of Oral Health Sciences. She may be contacted at 630-4710. Like their Facebook page, Dental Place Cosmetix Spa.

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CTOC to question prominent MoBay man

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CTOC to question prominent MoBay man

Sunday, September 15, 2019

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The Counter-Terrorism and Organised Crime Investigation (CTOC) Branch of the Jamaica Constabulary Force is to question a prominent Montego Bay businessman who has links with the tourism industry regarding activities carried out on behalf of his company while it was in liquidation.

The company was placed in liquidation twice by the Supreme Court. The contention, however, is that its principals conducted certain transactions, which included the filing of a lawsuit against another prominent Jamaican company, while the entity was in liquidation, which is believed to have contravened Jamaican law.

Allegations are that company executives acted without the permission of the court or the liquidator of the company.

Under Jamaican law, companies in liquidation can only act through a liquidator or by a directive of the court. Anything else could amount to an offence.

One investigator, who asked not to be identified, confirmed to the Jamaica Observer that the western Jamaica businessman would be questioned “soon” in relation to the alleged illegality of his company doing business while it was placed in liquidation.

“The lawyer has been contacted regarding the matter and he is scheduled to attend an interview shortly with his client,” the police source said.

CTOC was formed out of a merger of the Organised Crime Investigation Division, and the Flying Squad.

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