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Largest Wind Energy Facility in English-Speaking Caribbean Now on Jamaica Stock Exchange

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Prime Minister Andrew Holness (second left), observes as Chairman, Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica, Russell Hadeed (left), inserts the strip signifying Wigton Windfarm’s official listing on the Jamaica Stock Exchange. Also sharing in the moment are (from third left) Minister of Finance and the Public Service,Dr Nigel Clarke; Minister of Science, Energy and Technology Fayval Williams; and General Manager, Wigton Windfarm, Earl Bennett. (Photo Credit: JIS)

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Thursday May
23, 2019
– Wigton
Windfarm Limited is now listed on the Jamaica Stock Exchange (JSE), following the
success of its initial public offering (IPO), which saw some 31,200 Jamaicans
taking up the opportunity to own 11 billion shares in the company.

The offer,
the first IPO of a government-owned company in almost 30 years, was
oversubscribed. A total of 11,772 Jamaicans, or 38 per cent, are new investors.

Wigton
Windfarm, a subsidiary of the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ) and the
largest wind energy facility in the English-speaking Caribbean, is the 82nd
company to be listed on the JSE combined market.

Managing
Director of the JSE, Marlene Street-Forrest, said over 64 per cent of those who
invested in Wigton are under 50 years of age, with approximately 50 per cent
under 40.

“The
gender mix was also quite interesting, as more females applied for shares
within this IPO – that is 56 per cent to 44 per cent female-male ratio. The
average spend for a new investor was approximately $124,000, which on the basis
of all this, one can conclude that the public believes in this company and
expects that it will continue to do well. This is confirmed by the
oversubscription of the offer by over 158 per cent,” she said.

Speaking
at the official listing ceremony yesterday, Prime Minister Andrew Holness said
the Government is being instrumental and proactive in promoting ownership –
beyond just a piece of land or a home – while facilitating wealth creation for
Jamaicans at all levels.

“We are
expanding that concept of ownership to the average Jamaican to say that you can
own a piece of a profitable company, and more than that, as a shareholder you
have a powerful vote, not just the Directors. I believe the Government has
fulfilled its policy objectives and, indeed, the higher objective of starting
the ownership culture,” Holness said.

He said
there is significant gain in value in owning assets in companies.

“The
investment that you have made in Wigton is one that I am certain will yield
great future gains,” he said.

Wigton
Windfarm was built by the Government to help diversify Jamaica’s energy mix. It
began operating in 2004 with the commissioning of a 20.7-megawatt generating
plant, Wigton I. This was followed by the development of Wigton II in 2010,
which generates 18 megawatts of energy. Wigton III, the 24-megawatt expansion
of the facility, was officially commissioned into service in June 2016.

Meanwhile,
the Prime Minister said his Government is looking at divesting its shares in
other entities, such as the Central Waste Water Company, the Jamaica Public
Service Company, and the Jamaica Mortgage Bank.

Regarding
the Jamaica Mortgage Bank, he said the Cabinet submission has been approved
“for us to move forward with that divestment”.

“The modality, whether it is an IPO or otherwise, will be declared shortly,” Holness said.

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PAHO Warns of Complex Dengue Situation in the Caribbean

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WASHINGTON, United States, Tuesday August 20, 2019 – The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has warned of the complex situation of dengue in Latin America and the Caribbean, which is currently experiencing a new epidemic cycle of the disease after two years of low incidence.

According to
the latest PAHO epidemiological update, during the first seven months of 2019,
more than two million people contracted the disease and 723 died. The number of
cases exceeds the total number of cases reported in 2017 and 2018, although so
far, it remains lower than the number recorded in 2015-2016.

“The region
is experiencing a new epidemic cycle of dengue, with a notable increase in
cases,” said Dr Marcos Espinal, Director of PAHO’s Department of Communicable
Diseases and Environmental Determinants of Health. The climate, environmental
management and the mosquito’s capacity to adapt may have caused the situation
to increase in complexity.

Another
characteristic of the current epidemic is that children under the age of 15
appear to be among the most affected. In Guatemala, they represent 52 per cent
of total cases of severe dengue, while in Honduras, they constitute 66 per cent
of all confirmed deaths. According to Dr Espinal, this may be due to the fact
that their age means they have been less exposed to the virus in the past and
may therefore lack immunity.

Dengue is
caused by a virus that has four different, but closely related, serotypes:
DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3 and DEN-4, all of which circulate in the Americas. When a
person recovers from the infection, he acquires lifelong immunity against that
particular serotype. However, subsequent infections caused by other serotypes
increase the risk of acquiring more severe forms of dengue. Serotype 2 is one
of the deadliest and is the one currently affecting children and adolescents.

The ten
countries currently most affected by dengue, in terms of new cases per 100,000
inhabitants, are Nicaragua, Brazil, Honduras, Belize, Colombia, El Salvador,
Paraguay, Guatemala, Mexico and Venezuela. Honduras and Nicaragua have already
declared national-level epidemiological alerts this year to expedite the
response.

A call to eliminate mosquito breeding
sites in and around houses

Given the
situation, PAHO has already urged the entire community and all sectors of
society to work together to eliminate mosquito breeding sites, particularly
those around the home.

“Dengue is a
domestic and community sanitation problem,” said José Luis San Martin, PAHO’s
Regional Advisor on Dengue. “The most effective way to combat it is to
eliminate its breeding sites in order to prevent the mosquito from reproducing
because without mosquitoes there would be no transmission of dengue.”

According to
San Martin the community as a whole must get rid of all unused objects where
water can accumulate, such as drums, old tires, cans, bottles and vases.
Domestic water tanks must be hermetically sealed to avoid them becoming
hatcheries.

“Eliminating
hatcheries would hit the mosquito hard by interrupting its breeding cycle,
therefore reducing the mosquito population,” he said.

Priority: saving lives

PAHO has
also called for health professionals to be trained to diagnose and adequately
manage patients with dengue and other arboviruses such as Zika and Chikungunya.

“The proper
management of patients is a priority that can save lives,” said San
Martin, urging the population to avoid self-medicating and to instead visit a
health system early when experiencing symptoms of the disease.

The most
common symptoms are high fever (40 °C), severe headache, pain behind the
eyeballs, and joint and muscle aches. Warning signs of dengue that require urgent
medical attention include severe abdominal pain, persistent vomiting, rapid
breathing, bleeding from the mucous membranes, fatigue, irritability and presence
of blood in the vomit.

There is no specific treatment for dengue (or severe dengue), but timely detection, access to medical care and proper management of the patient can reduce complications and disease progression. Death from dengue is almost always avoidable.

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Guyanese Teachers to be Trained to teach Venezuelan Migrant Children

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GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Tuesday August 20,
2019 –
Nineteen
teachers will soon begin training which will equip them with the necessary
skills to teach English as a second language to children of Venezuelan migrants
who’ve travelled to the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) country to escape
hardship in the Spanish-speaking nation.

The
Government through the Ministry of Education said it has been working with the
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to develop
educational interventions, which will improve the learning and communication
skills of these children. Eight communities in Region One are expected to
benefit from this initiative.

UNHCR
representative on the Multi-Stakeholder Committee, Cecilie Guerrero made this
announcement at yesterday’s stakeholder meeting, which was held at the
Department of Citizenship. The Committee is tasked with monitoring the arrival
of Venezuelan migrants into Guyana.

Guerrero
informed the Committee that 17 teachers from Region One and two from Georgetown
will gather in Mabaruma later this week for the training, which will last until
the end of the month. The two Georgetown-based teachers, she said, will be
trained to be trainers. These teachers will be tasked with training their
colleagues when and wherever the need arises.

The
Committee was informed too that the Canadian based facilitator, who will be
conducting the training, arrived in Guyana earlier in the day.

So far, in
excess of 800 Venezuelan children are enrolled in schools.

Meanwhile,
the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is working along with the Guyana
Water Incorporated (GWI) to implement a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)
project, which focuses on the provision and storage of water, sanitation and
hygiene promotion interventions in six communities in Region One.

As part of
this project, a 100-metre well will be drilled at Whitewater, Region One, to
provide water on a consistent basis to residents. This will complement the rain
water harvesting tanks, water storage facilities and portable water filters,
which have already been handed over to the communities.

Given the positive impacts made in Barima-Waini through the pilot project, the two entities are now looking to roll out the project in Cuyuni – Mazaruni (Region Seven). It will target three communities in its initial phase: Eteringbang, Arrau and Kurutuku.

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Humanitarian Assistance to be Scaled-up for Millions of Venezuelans in Need

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Venezuelans waiting for food distribution. (Photo credit: NRC/Ingebjørg Kårstad)

CARACAS, Venezuela, Tuesday August 20,
2019 –
The United
Nations humanitarian wing launched a new Response Plan (HRP) on Wednesday, that
aims to help around 2.6 million people in Venezuela through to the end of the
year, almost half of whom are youth.

Noting that
the plan “only represents a limited number of all people in need”, the UN
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), said that US$223
million was required from donors, to achieve this goal. 

A collective
effort to coordinate and intensify the ongoing humanitarian response, the plan
aims to significantly mitigate the impact of the crisis on the country’s most
vulnerable populations.

“The HRP
includes 1.2 million girls and boys, in the areas of health, water, sanitation
and hygiene, food security, nutrition, protection, shelter and non-food items
and education,” Peter Grohmann, Humanitarian Coordinator for Venezuela, said in
the strategy’s foreword.

During the
first half of 2019, the UN set up a coordination system to increase
humanitarian response capacities that included national and international
non-governmental humanitarian organizations (NGOs) and the International Red
Cross and Red Crescent Movement as an observer, with OCHA lending overarching
support.

“This HRP
provides an internationally recognized framework for a principled, transparent,
well-coordinated and effective response, targeting the most vulnerable people,”
said the newly designated Humanitarian Coordinator, who leads the humanitarian
country team. “I urgently call on donors to support this plan.” 

At the same
time, Grohmann also called on the Venezuelan Government, society and the
international community “to work together and jointly commit to helping
Venezuelans in need of assistance, including by creating consensus on ways to
finance the plan”. 

By
strengthening the capacity of humanitarian organizations and further opening
the operational space in country, the HRP lays the foundation to enlarge its
response next year to reach a larger portion of the population.

While its operational capacities are on target to deliver, the HRP is “modest in terms of responding to the scale of needs”, Grohmann maintained, adding that the plan would be revised and expanded next year, “based on new available information on needs and capacities”.

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