Connect with us

African News

‘Universal Basic Income Doesn’t Work’

Published

on

An anonymous reader shares an opinion piece from The Guardian, written by analyst, writer and head of social policy for the New Economics Foundation, Anna Coote: A study published this week sheds doubt on ambitious claims made for universal basic income (UBI), the scheme that would give everyone regular, unconditional cash payments that are enough to live on. Its advocates claim it would help to reduce poverty, narrow inequalities and tackle the effects of automation on jobs and income. Research conducted for Public Services International, a global trade union federation, reviewed for the first time 16 practical projects that have tested different ways of distributing regular cash payments to individuals across a range of poor, middle-income and rich countries, as well as copious literature on the topic.

It could find no evidence to suggest that such a scheme could be sustained for all individuals in any country in the short, medium or longer term — or that this approach could achieve lasting improvements in wellbeing or equality. The research confirms the importance of generous, non-stigmatizing income support, but everything turns on how much money is paid, under what conditions and with what consequences for the welfare system as a whole. […] The cost of a sufficient UBI scheme would be extremely high according to the International Labor Office, which estimates average costs equivalent to 20-30% of GDP in most countries. Costs can be reduced — and have been in most trials — by paying smaller amounts to fewer individuals. But there is no evidence to suggest that a partial or conditional UBI scheme could do anything to mitigate, let alone reverse, current trends towards worsening poverty, inequality and labor insecurity. Costs may be offset by raising taxes or shifting expenditure from other kinds of public expenditure, but either way there are huge and risky trade-offs. As this week’s report observes, “If cash payments are allowed to take precedence, there’s a serious risk of crowding out efforts to build collaborative, sustainable services and infrastructure — and setting a pattern for future development that promotes commodification rather than emancipation.”

The report concludes that the money needed to pay for an adequate UBI scheme “would be better spent on reforming social protection systems, and building more and better-quality public services.”

Source link

قالب وردپرس

African News

Tanzania to open first gold refinery plant in October: official

Published

on

By

FILE PHOTO: Gold bars and coins are stacked.
INTERNATIONAL  –Tanzania is set to export fully refined gold from October this year upon completion of the first gold refinery plant in the country currently under construction in the nation’s capital, Dodoma, a senior official said on Tuesday.

Dotto Biteko, Tanzania’s Minister for Minerals said that once operation begins, the country will be able to establish national gold reserve as called for in the Mining Act.

He noted that it will also enable the Central Bank of Tanzania purchase and store gold following President John Magufuli’s directive for the bank to do so. “This will be the first gold refinery to operate in the country.

Previously, gold was refined outside the country,” said Biteko. The government set up 28 mineral trading centers since March this year to improve revenue collection from artisanal miners.

Following the setting up the mineral trading centers, gold worth $60 million has been traded through the centers and the government has collected $3 million royalty and clearance fees, Biteko said last month.

Small-scale miners produce around 20 tonnes of gold a year, but 90 percent is illegally exported, according to a parliamentary report. 

Tanzanian President John Magufuli said recently that revenue collection from mining had increased over the past two years after his government tightened controls. “Our minerals have been stolen through smuggling or through exploitative mining contracts,” said Magufuli. 

XINHUA

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

African News

Police And Demonstrators Clash, Ending Stretch Of Calm : NPR

Published

on

By

Police and pro-democracy demonstrators clashed during a protest in Hong Kong on Saturday. The protests in Hong Kong started in June over an unpopular bill that would allow extraditions to mainland China.

Vincent Yu/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Vincent Yu/AP

Police and pro-democracy demonstrators clashed during a protest in Hong Kong on Saturday. The protests in Hong Kong started in June over an unpopular bill that would allow extraditions to mainland China.

Vincent Yu/AP

After a stretch of relative peace in Hong Kong, a standoff between protesters and riot police became violent again on Saturday.

Police fired tear gas after pro-democracy demonstrators blocked roads with barricades made of bamboo sticks and hurled bricks, in the district of Kwun Tong.

In a statement, police said protesters paralyzed traffic and affected emergency services in the area near a police station.

Protesters tore down and dismantled “smart lamp posts” out of a fear that they contain high-tech cameras and facial recognition software used for surveillance by authorities in China.

Some used an electric saw, attempting to slice through the bottom of the lamppost, while others tied a rope around it to successfully bring it crashing to the ground, the Associated Press reported.

The government in Hong Kong insists that the lampposts only collect data on weather, air quality and traffic, according to the AP.

There are plans to install about 400 of these smart lampposts over a three-year period, according to a government report.

Demonstrators try to pull down a smart lamppost during the protest in Hong Kong on Saturday that turned violent. The smart lampposts are raising fears of stepped-up surveillance from authorities.

Kin Cheung/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Kin Cheung/AP

Demonstrators try to pull down a smart lamppost during the protest in Hong Kong on Saturday that turned violent. The smart lampposts are raising fears of stepped-up surveillance from authorities.

Kin Cheung/AP

The latest skirmish marked the 12th straight weekend of demonstrations in Hong Kong and ended nearly two weeks of relative calm, according to the AP.

Just a day before, thousands of Hong Kongers held hands and formed human chains, in a peaceful bid to gain support from the international community, NPR’s Anthony Kuhn reported.

On Saturday, Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam expressed a desire to open a dialogue on Facebook.

“I don’t expect that dialogue will be able to easily untangle this knot, stop the demonstrations or provide a solution to the problem,” Lam wrote. “But continuing to fight is not a way out.”

“After more than two months, everyone is tired. Can we sit down and talk about it?” she wrote.

Just a few hours later, protests in Kwun Tong turned violent, according to the New York Times.

The protests in Hong Kong originally began in June over a bill that would have allowed some extraditions of Hong Kong residents to mainland China. The bill sparked a backlash among those who saw it as a violation of the “one country, two systems” agreement that was formed in 1997 when Hong Kong was returned to China from the British.

The bill has since been shelved but it’s not formally dead. Hong Kong’s government indefinitely suspended the legislation in June but hasn’t withdrawn it entirely from the legislative process.

The demands from the movement have since expanded and now include calls to investigate excessive police violence during the demonstrations and a more transparent and open government.

Also on Saturday, Simon Cheng, a worker from the British Consulate in Hong Kong, was released after being detained in mainland China.

Cheng disappeared on a business trip in mainland China two weeks ago amid the rising tensions between Beijing and London.

It wasn’t immediately clear whether Cheng’s detention had anything to do with Britain’s support of the pro-democracy protests, NPR’s Scott Neuman reported.

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

African News

EPL live scores and result

Published

on

By

You can find our lives cores at the bottom of this preview.

Early Premier League leaders Liverpool and
Arsenal face-off at Anfield on Saturday where one of the only two remaining 100
percent records in the Premier League will go.

 The
European champions will hope to continue a fine recent record against the north
Londoners.

Jurgen Klopp has never lost in seven
previous Premier League meetings against Arsenal and his side have beaten the
Gunners 4-0 and 5-1 at home in the past two seasons.

However, Unai Emery’s outfit are hoping a
busy summer in the transfer window, while Liverpool did not strengthen, will
have significantly narrowed the 27-point gap between the sides last season.

Emery could hand a first start to £72
million ($87 million) club record signing Nicolas Pepe, while on-loan Real
Madrid midfielder Dani Ceballos earned rave reviews by creating both goals on
his full debut against Burnley last weekend.

This can 
be seen as an early opportunity for veteran centre-back David Luiz to
make his mark by halting the free-scoring trio of Sadio Mane, Roberto Firmino
and Mohamed Salah, who combined for all five Liverpool goals when the sides
last met.

The Gunners 
have some outstanding finishers of their own. Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang,
who shared the Premier League Golden Boot with Mane and Salah last season, has
scored his side’s winner in the first two games of the campaign

English Premier League live scores on 23-25 August

Get the latest English Premier League scores below. Get fixtures and results from all the weekend’s English Premier League matches here.

Scores will be live at kick off.

DMCA.com Protection Status

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Trending