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Listen To Likkle Addi New Single “Dollar Sign” Adidjaheim Records

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likkle addi Dollar Sign adidjaheim records 2019


Vybz Kartel’s son Likkle Addi debuted his new music single titled “Dollar Sign”, which was produced by World Boss own imprinting Adidjaheim Records.

Likkle Addi and Likkle Vybz are two of the sons that of incarcerated Dancehall King Vybz Kartel, and their mom is Tanesha Johnson aka Shorty, Kartel’s wife and owner of the music label Short Boss Muzick. Their two sons together are part of the group PG13, which already released several little bangers like Hero“, “Every Girl Out There“, “Family” & “Radio“. Their songs went so well they debuted already several official music videos, making very young stars in their homeland Jamaica.

Growing up into music since tender age both Kartel’s kids are naturals behind the mic and on the scene. Determined and ready to follow their parents foot steps into the music business, the duo has been interviewed and performed on Jamaican National TV during Onstage TV Show with Winford Williams.

Currently working on his solo career, check out the amazing lyrics video for Likkle Addi’s new single “Dolla Sign” posted below.

Distributed by Zojak Worldwide and available on all major music platforms get Likkle Addi new music single “Dolla Sign” clicking on the iTunes banner on top of the page.

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Bahamian Officials Nab 12 Migrants in Human Smuggling and Drug Trafficking Bust

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NASSAU, The Bahamas, Monday July 15, 2019 – A joint operation by Bahamas Immigration Department and Royal Bahamas Defence Force to crack down on human and drug smuggling has nabbed 13 people, including 12 migrants from Europe, East Asia and Latin American and the Caribbean.

The migrants of five foreign countries, along with a Bahamian, were apprehended aboard a 25-foot go-fast vessel by a Defence Force patrol craft with Defence Force Marines and Immigration officials off West End, Grand Bahama last Friday.

A search of the vessel uncovered one Bahamian, five Jamaicans, two Colombians, two Chinese, two Haitians, and a Lithuanian on board along with 17 pounds of marijuana.

The captain and occupants of the vessel were taken into custody and handed over to police and Immigration officials.

The Defence Force said in a statement announcing the arrests, that it “remains committed to protecting the territorial integrity of The Bahamas”.

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Guyana Filling Legal Gaps to Protect Against Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity

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Minister of Social Protection Amna Ally

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Monday July 15, 2019 – The Guyana Government says it has been working to
ensure all legal gaps are removed to prevent discrimination based on sexual orientation
and gender identity.

This was revealed by Minister
of Social Protection Amna Ally during her presentation of Guyana’s National
Statement on the Ninth periodic report at the 73rd Session of the Committee for
the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) at the United Nations
Headquarters, Geneva Switzerland last Friday.

According to Minister Ally,
the principle of equality and non-discrimination is enshrined in Article 149 of
the revised Constitution of Guyana and guarantees the fundamental rights and
freedoms of people living in the state. The Social Protection Ministry, she
said, has established an active dialogue with stakeholders and is working
towards the path to filling the gaps to prevent discrimination based on sexual
orientation and gender identity.

“The government believes that
every individual regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity has an inherent
human right to live their life free from violence, abuse and discrimination,” Ally
told the meeting.

On the morning of June 16,
Managing Director of the Society Against Sexual Orientation Discrimination
(SASOD), Joel Simpson was allegedly beaten by a group of men, hours after those
same men attacked him at a night club. The incident is under investigation by
the police.

“Such an incident has no place
in our society, despite the many challenges we continue to encounter such as
cultural attitudes of many within our society, the government of Guyana remains
firmly committed to protecting and promoting the dignity and freedom of every human
being,” Ally said.

She said SASOD has been
working closely with the hierarchy of the Guyana Police Force (GPF), and a
number of measures have been initiated aimed at retraining and training police
officers on how to respond professionally to complaints from LGBTQ persons,
especially when their human rights are violated or when they are accessing
general services.

Since the establishment of
Guyana’s four rights commission following the 2001/2003 constitutional reforms,
the government has recognized that the agencies need review and strengthening.
In the case of the rights commissions that have operated in the last decade
(rights of children, women and gender equality, Indigenous peoples), this
review will encompass the adequacy of their mandates and resources based on
results to date. In the case of the human rights commission, the current
structure will be revisited in the context of the original constitutional
reform commission’s recommendation for a more independent and empowered
commission.

“Guyana’s National Gender and
Social Inclusion policy will provide strong leadership within institutions to
ensure that a gender perspective is reflected in all its practices, policies
and programmes,” Minister Ally vowed.

This policy is geared towards
moving forward with prevention strategies and supporting multi-sectoral
responses to violence against women and girls.

Ally said that Guyana has been selected as one of six beneficiary Caribbean countries of this spotlight initiative, and the government is currently in the process of formulating a country programme with the assistance of the EU, UN and all relevant stakeholders…and is expected to be finalized and approved in November 2019.

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UN Human Rights Report on Venezuela urges Immediate Measures to Halt and Remedy Grave Rights Violations

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UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet

WASHINGTON, United States, Monday July 15, 2019 – A UN human rights report has urged the Government
of Venezuela to take immediate, concrete measures to halt and remedy the grave
violations of economic, social, civil, political and cultural rights documented
in the country.

The recent report by the
Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights warns that if the situation
does not improve, the unprecedented outflow of Venezuelan migrants and refugees
will continue, and the living conditions of those who remain will worsen.

The report, mandated by the UN
Human Rights Council, states that over the last decade – and especially since
2016 – the Government and its institutions have implemented a strategy “aimed
at neutralizing, repressing and criminalizing political opponents and people
critical of the Government.” A series of laws, policies and practices has
restricted the democratic space, dismantled institutional checks and balances,
and allowed patterns of grave violations. The report also highlights the impact
of the deepening economic crisis that has left people without the means to
fulfil their fundamental rights to food and health, among others.

Based on 558 interviews with
victims and witnesses of human rights violations and the deteriorating economic
situation, in Venezuela and eight other countries, as well as other sources,
the report covers the period from January 2018 to May 2019.

The UN High Commissioner for
Human Rights Michelle Bachelet was able to visit the country for three days
last month to meet a wide range of actors, including President Nicolas Maduro,
other senior Government officials, the President of the National Assembly,
civil society, business representatives, academics and other stakeholders, as
well as victims and their families. A team of two UN human rights officers
remained in the country after her visit, with an agreed mandate to provide
technical assistance and advice, and to monitor the human rights situation.

“During my visit to Venezuela,
I was able to hear first-hand the accounts of victims of State violence and
their demands for justice. I have faithfully conveyed their voices, and those
of civil society, as well as the human rights violations documented in this
report, to the relevant authorities,” High Commissioner Bachelet said.

“We have the Government’s
commitment to work with us to resolve some of the thorniest issues – including
the use of torture and access to justice – and to allow us full access to
detention facilities. The situation is complex, but this report contains clear
recommendations on immediate steps that can be taken to stop ongoing
violations, bring justice to victims, and create a space for meaningful
discussion. We are ready to work constructively with all relevant stakeholders,
and to continue to advocate for the rights of all the people of Venezuela, no
matter what their political affiliations may be.”

The report details how State
institutions have been steadily militarized over the past decade. During the
reporting period, civil and military forces have allegedly been responsible for
arbitrary detentions; ill-treatment and torture of people critical of the
Government and their relatives; sexual and gender-based violence in detention
and during visits; and excessive use of force during demonstrations.*

Pro-government armed civilian
groups, known as colectivos, have contributed to the deteriorating situation by
exercising social control and helping repress demonstrations. The UN Human
Rights Office has documented 66 deaths during protests between January and May
2019, 52 attributable to Government security forces or colectivos.

The incidence of alleged extrajudicial
killings by security forces, particularly the special forces (FAES), in the
context of security operations has been shockingly high, the report states. In
2018, the Government registered 5,287 killings, purportedly for “resistance to
authority,” during such operations. Between 1 January and 19 May this year,
another 1,569 people were killed, according to Government figures. Other
sources suggest the figures may be much higher.

The report also notes that as
of May 31, 2019, 793 people remained arbitrarily deprived of their liberty,
including 58 women, and that so far this year, 22 deputies of the National
Assembly, including its President, have been stripped of their parliamentary
immunity.

While the High Commissioner
welcomed the recent release of 62 political prisoners, she called on the
authorities to release all the others in detention or otherwise deprived of
their liberty, for peacefully exercising their fundamental rights.

The report highlights that the
majority of victims of human rights violations have not had effective access to
justice and remedies.

“According to interviewees,
few people file complaints for fear of reprisals and lack of trust in the
justice system,” the report states. Those that do, mainly women, face pervasive
obstacles, with no progress in the majority of the investigations. “The
Attorney-General’s Office has regularly failed to comply with its obligation to
investigate and prosecute perpetrators, and the Ombudsperson has remained
silent vis-à-vis human rights violations.”

On freedom of expression, the
report notes that the space for free and independent media has shrunk through
the banning and closure of media outlets, and detention of independent
journalists: “Over the past years, the Government has attempted to impose a
communicational hegemony by enforcing its own version of events and creating an
environment that curtails independent media.”

While the economy of Venezuela
was in crisis well before any sectoral sanctions were imposed, the report says
that the latest economic sanctions linked to oil exports are further
exacerbating the effects of the crisis.

In addition, it says, the
State is violating its obligations to ensure the rights to food and health. The
progressive scarcity and unaffordability of food have meant fewer meals of
lower nutritional value, high levels of malnutrition, and a particularly
adverse impact on women, some of whom reported spending an average of 10 hours
per day queuing for food. Despite the Government’s efforts to tackle the situation
through social programmes, large sections of the population do not have access
to food distribution, and interviewees accused the authorities of excluding
them because they are not Government supporters.

The health situation in the
country is dire, with hospitals lacking staff, supplies, medicines and
electricity to keep vital machinery running. The report cites the 2019 National
Hospital Survey, which found that between November 2018 and February 2019,
1,557 people died because of lack of supplies in hospitals.

The report also sheds light on
the disproportionate impact of the humanitarian situation on indigenous
peoples, and their loss of control of their land for various reasons, including
the presence of military forces, and because of the presence of organised
criminal gangs and armed groups. “Mining, particularly in Amazonas and
Bolivar…has resulted in violations of various collective rights, including
rights to maintain customs, traditional ways of life, and a spiritual
relationship with their land,” the report states.

The report sets out a series
of recommendations for the Government on the key human rights violations
documented by the UN Human Rights Office.

“I sincerely hope the
authorities will take a close look at all the information included in this
report and will follow its recommendations. We should all be able to agree that
all Venezuelans deserve a better life, free from fear and with access to
adequate food, water, healthcare, housing and all other basic human needs,”
Bachelet said.

“A Catholic priest in Caracas
said to me: ‘This is not about politics, but about the suffering of the
people.’ This report too is not about politics, geopolitics, international
relations or anything other than being about the human rights to which every Venezuelan
is entitled.

“I call on all those with the power and influence – within Venezuela and elsewhere – to work together, and to make the necessary compromises to resolve this all-consuming crisis. My Office stands ready to continue doing its part,” she added.

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