Connect with us

African News

Sony’s new Xperia smartphones offer a standout 21:9 viewing experience

Published

on

Leading smartphone brand Sony Mobile has launched three new smartphones, offering powerful features and stunning design.

At the top of the pile is the flagship Sony Xperia 10 Plus, offering more screen and more possibilities to users. Alongside the Xperia 10 Plus is the slightly smaller Xperia 10, while Sony has also unveiled the Xperia L3, which offers remarkable value for money.

Sony is the first to introduce the 21:9 aspect ratio to the smartphone market, offering a true new viewing experience for owners of the Xperia 10 or 10 Plus. Whether you plan on gaming, consuming video content, or just browsing through your social media – the Sony Xperia 10 range’s wide display will enhance this experience significantly.

Additionally, this wide display resolution is perfect for running two apps simultaneously, allowing users enhanced productivity benefits alongside its standout entertainment value. This dual-app functionality also feeds into your entertainment experience – you can text your friends while simultaneously watching a video, for example.

Here are the highlights of Sony’s three newest mid-range smartphones.

Xperia 10 Plus

Xperia 10 Plus

The Xperia 10 Plus offers users a full HD+ 6.5-inch display in its wide, all-new 21:9 aspect ratio. The 21:9 aspect ratio extends to the capturing of videos and images, fitting the screen perfectly and offering a truly amazing experience.

However, it’s not just the aspect ratio of the camera that makes it stand out. The Xperia 10 Plus offers a potent dual-camera set up, using 12MP and 8MP lenses and offering users 2x optical zoom when taking photographs. It also lets you use Bokeh effect to add extra drama to your photographs.

Under the hood, the Xperia 10 Plus offers fantastic value thanks to its powerful Qualcomm Snapdragon 636 octa-core chipset. It also offers users 4GB RAM and 64GB onboard memory.

You’re guaranteed to have a great time listening to your favourite songs thanks to advanced audio technology, including Sony’s High Resolution Audio and LDAC technology, which is present within both the Xperia 10 Plus and the Xperia 10.

The Xperia 10 Plus has a recommended retail price of R8,999 – offering great performance at an affordable price.

Sony Xperia X10 Plus
Operating System Android 9.0 Pie
Display 6.5-inch HD+, 21:9 aspect ratio
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 636
RAM 4GB
Storage 64GB
Primary Camera 12MP + 8MP with 2x Optical Zoom
Battery 3,000mAh
Price R8,999

Xperia 10

Xperia 10

The Sony Xperia 10 is a slightly smaller alternative to its flagship 10 Plus brother.

Sporting a 6-inch full HD+ display, the Xperia 10’s screen also utilises Sony’s all-new 21:9 aspect ratio.

It also offers a dual-lens camera system, ensuring that you take superior photos. These two lenses offer 13MP and 5MP photography respectively, and it also take photographs in a 21:9 ratio. Like the Xperia 10 plus, you have access to Bokeh effect for added photography options.

It packs quite the punch in terms of performance, offering 3GB RAM and 64GB onboard memory, while utilising Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 630 mobile platform as its chipset.

The Xperia 10 has a recommended retail price of R6,499, which offers a cheaper, yet still powerful, alternative to the Xperia 10 Plus.

Sony Xperia X10
Operating System Android 9.0 Pie
Display 6-inch HD+, 21:9 aspect ratio
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 630
RAM 3GB
Storage 64GB
Primary Camera 13MP + 5MP
Battery 2,870mAh
Price R8,999

Xperia L3

Xperia L3

Last, but certainly not least, is the Sony Xperia L3 smartphone. This black device boasts a 5.7-inch HD+ display, which utilises an 18:9 aspect ratio.

The Xperia L3 offers a 13MP and 2MP dual camera system, as well as a powerful 8MP front camera that offers users engaging portrait selfie effects. Like the X10 range, the L3 includes bokeh effect to allow you to take creative, artistic photographs.

Its sizeable 3300mAh battery is another fantastic feature that will keep your phone running for ages – whether you’re taking photos or in a call.

The L3 features 3GB RAM and 32GB onboard memory, as well as an octa-core processor that will ensure that your experience is smooth and reliable.

Considering these powerful features, the recommended price of R4,499 offers fantastic value to those looking for a high-quality smartphone without breaking the bank.

Sony Xperia L3
Operating System Android 8.0 Oreo
Display 6-inch HD+, 18:9 aspect ratio
Processor Octa-core processor
RAM 3GB
Storage 32GB
Primary Camera 13MP + 2MP
Battery 3,300mAh
Price R4,499

Made for Xperia accessories for these three smartphones will be available in stores, allowing you to customise your Xperia smartphone and truly make it your own.

Find these and other great Sony smartphones on their website.

This article was published in partnership with Sony Mobile.

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

African News

PICS: Occupied house left in ruins by now-evicted BLF members

Published

on

By

A lawyer from Pretoria has managed to have a group of Black First Land First (BLF) members who had occupied a house in Brooklyn, Pretoria, evicted – according to Sunday newspaper Rapport.

The paper reported that the sheriff of the court removed the occupiers on Friday after an eviction order was issued by the Gauteng High Court in Pretoria.

The party – who managed to garner a mere 0.11% of votes nationally on the May 8 general elections – suffered another blow last week when it was forced to give up on a court fight for its supporters who occupied the house in the posh Pretoria suburb of Brooklyn, Times Select reported. 

Times Select had reportedly seen a letter written by BLF leader Andile Mngxitama to attorney Mike Potgieter, the executor of the deceased estate of Willem and Dorothea Serfontein – the owners of the property at the centre of the legal battle.

“We confirm having arranged for the applicant’s attorney (Potgieter) to inform the court … that the respondent [BLF and the group of illegal occupiers] are hereby withdrawing from this case as they were unable to secure legal representation due to the lack of funds,” the letter reads.

“The respondents ask that the court make no order as to costs (each party to pay its own costs) and the respondents do not have funds to attend the court.”

Toilets were used but not flushed. (Deon Raath, Rapport)

The Citizen reported about the occupation of the house in August last year. 

House stood empty for years

The house “invaders”, who claim to be students, moved into the unoccupied thatched-roof house [in July 2018], The Citizen reported.

When confronted, they reportedly said they could not afford accommodation and called their “lawyer”, who turned out to be Mngxitama, who is not an attorney.

According to The Citizen, Potgieter launched an urgent application to have the students evicted, saying they illegally gained access to the property and were trespassing. Judge Nelisa Mali, however, ruled that the application was not urgent and struck it off the roll.

The main house on the property had reportedly been standing empty for years after the owners died, leaving the property to their sons, who both live abroad.

On Thursday, Judge A.J. Brand ruled that Amanda Mjindi, Dlozi Mthetwa and others living at 235 Brooks Street in Brooklyn must leave the property and carry the costs of the eviction order, Rapport reported. 

‘They moved in to destroy the house’

Rapport quoted Renier de Meyer of Interactive Security, who said the eviction was carried out without incident.

He told that publication that it appeared that the BLF members had moved into the house “to destroy” and estimated damages to the property at R500 000.

The kitchen was so dirty that security guards battled to open the door. (Deon Raath, Rapport)

Back in August last year, Times Select reported that, when its reporter visited the house, the neighbours, who did not want to be named, expressed concern about the situation and that their sympathy levels with the group of occupiers were low.

“I am worried about the value of my property going down,” one neighbour reportedly said.

According to Rapport, the house had been stripped of electrical wiring and light fittings, the interior of the house had been severely neglected, toilets had been used but not flushed and litter was lying around everywhere. The garden and pool were also reportedly in a state of severe disrepair.

Mngxitama requested that Rapport send him questions in writing. To this, he reportedly replied: “F*ck you.” 

BLF members on the pavement after being evicted from a house they had occupied. (Deon Raath, Rapport)

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

African News

Three Geeks Rescue a 50-Year-Old IBM 360 Mainframe From an Abandoned Building

Published

on

By

In late April of 2019 Slashdot reader Adam Bradley and engineer Chris Blackburn were “sitting in a pub on a Monday night when Chris happened across a somewhat unusual eBay listing…”

They eventually submitted the winning bid for an IBM 360 Model 20 mainframe — €3,710 (about $4,141 USD) — and proceeded to pick it up from an abandoned building “in the backstreets of Nuremberg, Germany.” (Where they tackled several issues with a tiny door that hadn’t been opened since the 1970s.) By day Adam is a railway software engineer, but he’s also been involved in computer history for over a decade at The National Museum of Computing in Bletchley, England.

Along with engineer Peter Vaughan, the three are now blogging “the saga that unfurled…and how we eventually tackled the problems we discovered.” But after much beer, whisky, and Weiner Schnitzel, Adam assures us the story ends with a victory:
The machine will shortly be headed to the UK for a full restoration to working order. We’re planning to blog the entire process and hope some of you might be interested in reading more about it.

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

African News

The hidden lives of ‘housegirls’ in Kenya

Published

on

By

In Uganda, young women are leaving their homes to try and find jobs as domestic workers, but for some their new lives can lead to mistreatment and abuse.

A charity in Kenya is calling for the introduction of laws to protect domestic workers, commonly referred to as housegirls, to ensure their safety.

For BBC Africa Eye, reporter Nancy Kacungira has been investigating why young women living near Uganda’s border are leaving their villages to find work in Kenya.

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Trending