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This Day in History — March 8

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Today is the 67th day of 2019. There are 298 days left in the year.

 

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHTS

2011: The European Union adopts a plan to double its efforts to boost energy efficiency in order to cut greenhouse gases, partly by producing better household appliances, renovating public buildings and private homes, and driving improved cars.

 

OTHER EVENTS

1618: German astronomer Johannes Kepler devises his third law of planetary motion.

1702: England’s Queen Anne ascends the throne upon the death of King William III.

1765: Britain’s House of Lords passes Stamp Act to tax American colonies.

1865: A canal is begun in the Netherlands to connect Amsterdam with the North Sea.

1898: United States refuses to support Britain in its conflict with Russia over a loan to China.

1904: Germany revises 1872 anti-Jesuit law to permit return of some members of the Roman Catholic order.

1917: Riots and strikes break out in St Petersburg, marking the start of Russian Revolution.

1957: Ghana is admitted to the United Nations.

1965: United States lands 3,500 Marines in South Vietnam.

1969: Soviet Union puts its Far East army on alert as warning to China after frontier clash on Ussuri River.

1970: Cyprus President Archbishop Makarios escapes assassination when terrorist snipers shoot down his helicopter.

1986: Guerrilla violence in Colombia takes seven lives a day before national elections.

1987: Sri Lankan troops launch large new offensive, killing 11 separatist Tamil Tiger rebels in northern Jaffna peninsula.

1989: Chinese troops converge on Tibetan capital of Lhasa to enforce martial law following three days of anti-Chinese rioting.

1990: West German Parliament adopts resolution calling on united Germany to honour Poland’s western border.

1996: China fires three ballistic missiles into waters off Taiwan’s main ports, two weeks before the island’s first presidential elections.

1997: Hundreds of people flee southern Albania, fearing clashes between the Government and armed insurgents.

1998: James McDougal, one of the most important cooperating witnesses in Kenneth Starr’s investigation into President Bill Clinton’s Whitewater real estate dealings, dies in prison.

1999: The US Energy Department fires a Taiwanese-born scientist suspected of handing over nuclear missile technology to China in the 1980s.

2003: An Argentine court releases an indictment ordering the arrest of four former Iranian government officials for their alleged role in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community centre in Buenos Aires, in which 85 people were killed.

2004: A female wing of Nepal’s Maoist rebel movement, the All Nepal Women’s Association (Revolutionary), calls a general strike to protest violence against women, bringing this Himalayan kingdom to a standstill.

2005: The UN war crimes court indicts Kosovo’s prime minister for alleged atrocities while commanding ethnic Albanian insurgents against Serb forces in the struggle for control of the province.

2006: Tens of thousands of Sudanese march through Khartoum protesting plans to deploy UN peacekeepers in conflict-torn Darfur and demanding the expulsion of the top UN and US envoys in the country.

2008: US President George W Bush vetoes a Bill that would have banned the Central Intelligence Agency from using simulated drowning and other coercive interrogation methods to gain information from suspected terrorists. Barack Obama captures the Wyoming Democratic caucuses.

2013: Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez is lauded at his State funeral as a modern-day reincarnation of Latin American liberator Simon Bolivar and a disciple of Cuba’s Fidel Castro.

2014: Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, a Boeing 777 with 239 people on board, vanishes during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, setting off a massive search. (To date, the fate of the jetliner and its occupants have yet to be determined.)

2017: Many American women stay home from work, join rallies or wear red to demonstrate how vital they were to the US economy, as International Women’s Day was observed with a multitude of events around the world, including the Day Without a Woman in the US. Fire sweeps through a crowded youth shelter near Guatemala City, killing 40 girls.

 

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

Richard Howe, English admiral (1726-1799); Oliver Wendell Holmes, US jurist (1809-1894); Juana de Ibarbourou, Uruguayan poet (1895-1979); Cyd Charisse, US actress-dancer (1923-2008); Lynn Redgrave, British actress (1943-2010); Aidan Quinn, US actor (1959- ); Camryn Manheim, US actress (1961- )

— AP

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Summer camps to help improve police-citizen relations

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THE Citizen Security and Justice Programme (CSJP) III is optimistic that the youth summer camps being funded under the programme will assist in improving relations between the police and citizens.

The CSJP III is supporting six residential and non-residential camps between July and August, targeted at young people in communities in which it operates across the island.

Speaking at a recent Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Think Tank, CSJP III communications/social marketing specialist Patrice Tomlinson-Nephew said that the programme is committed to working with the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), through its Community Safety and Security Branch (CSSB), to increase engagement with citizens.

“All of our services offered — which include increasing their economic prospects, introducing them to life skills, and conflict resolution — are good, but if we don’t help to bridge the gap between police and citizens, it is almost as if our efforts might have been futile,” she explained.

Tomlinson-Nephew said that the CSJP III recognises the positive impact of building good relations between the police and community members, particularly the youth.

“These youngsters are exposed to another side of the JCF so they will understand that police personnel are human beings just like them. They will also gain a greater appreciation for law and order, so that is the rationale behind supporting camps that help to bridge police-citizen relations,” she added.

Sergeant Alexander Bloomfield, who also addressed the think tank, said “The police is there to reassure (citizens) that we aren’t just there to protect but also to serve them in whatever capacity that is necessary.

“We go into these communities daily to build a relationship, especially with the youth, for them to understand that we as the police officers cannot do our job without them,” he explained.

The summer camps funded by the CSJP III are coordinated by the Kingston Western division, St Andrew South division, Kingston South CSSB, St James Division, Kingston Eastern Division, St Andrew Central Division Sports Club, and the Office of the Children’s Advocate.

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PHOTO: Giving back

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Novlet Davis-Bucknor (left), founder of the United States-based LJDR Davis Foundation and a former resident of Brandon Hill, Clarendon, and dental technician Natalee Afflick (centre), reassure Brandon Hill resident Gabriel Dean as she undergoes a dental exam and cleaning. Gabriel was among more than 1,000 residents of Brandon Hill and surrounding communities who benefitted from a health fair staged by the foundation, in association with the Cari- Med Foundation, from July 15 to 18 at Evelyn…

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Hospital CEO says solar energy system has proven its worth

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BUSTAMANTE Hospital for Children — the only specialist paediatric hospital in the English-speaking Caribbean — has managed to reduce its energy bill, thanks to the support of Guardsman Games.

The purchase of a Turn-Key Grid-Tied System for US$10,494, from proceeds of the games by Guardsman Group Limited, was officially handed over to the hospital in July 2018.

According to David Arscott — senior manager of Future Energy Corporation, the company commissioned to install the solar energy system — the hospital is reaping monetary benefits.

“The 5kW system has an estimated production of 7,000 kwh (Kilowatt hours) annually. This will give an estimated annual savings of around $300,000 and is projected to provide a lifetime savings of $28,759,495,” Arscott is quoted in a recent release.

The hospital’s Chief Executive Officer Camille Panton shared that the system has proven its worth in its first year of operations.

“We are always adding new equipment, so if we were not getting that help from the solar energy system we would be faced with much higher electricity costs,” she is quoted as saying in the release.

Funding for the donation was made possible through part proceeds from 2017 Guardsman Games, and the system is currently being used to aid in powering the hospital’s Intensive Care Unit.

Panton explained that the system feeds into the hospital’s power grid while also controlling costs.

“Before the installations, we were seeing the electricity bill constantly rising, but while it now fluctuates, it is predominantly lower,” Panton shared.

The hospital CEO also highlights that the solar energy system is state-of-the-art and has required no repairs in its first year of operations.

“The system is working well, and the company which the system was purchased from has indicated that once we have any difficulties, they stand ready to facilitate us at any time,” she said.

The system can also be expanded to increase the energy produced by the solar panels.

The system’s cost of generation is US$0.06 per kilowatt hour, 82 per cent lower when compared to US$0.35 per kilowatt hour by the light and power company, Jamaica Public Service, the release continued.

The system is also expected to provide green energy for the next 40 years, while paying back its investment value in five years.

On Sunday, July 28, 2019, charity, athleticism and team spirit will converge in one space again with the Guardsman Games — comprising three events: Guardsman Challenge, LASCO Food Drink Tuff Kids Challenge, and Power Games.

Guardsman Challenge — a six-kilometre race with more than 20 obstacles — also serves as a qualifying race for individuals to represent Jamaica at the Obstacle Course Race World Championships in London, England. It starts at 6:00 am.

The LASCO Food Drink Tuff Kids Challenge, for children between nine and 14 years old, starts at 11:00 am.

The team event, Power Games, will host its Wild Card Play-off at 12:00 pm, closing with the finals at 1:00 pm, the release said.

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